GIVEAWAY: Netac Shadow Series RGB DDR5-4800 (16GB x 2) dual-channel memory kits

Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 328

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 328.

Dream Chaser Space Plane hitches ride on rocket for ISS cargo mission

Jak Connor | Aug 15, 2019 4:12 AM CDT

NASA will be allowing the private Dream Chase space plane to hitch a ride on their new Vulcan Centaur rocket to the International Space Station (ISS).

Dream Chaser Space Plane hitches ride on rocket for ISS cargo mission | TweakTown.com

According to a new announcement out of the Sierra Nevada Corp, their space shuttle-like vessel that resembles much like a plane, is scheduled to launch with the new Vulcan Centaur rocket that's headed to the ISS. Dream Chaser will be transporting more than 12,000 lbs (5,400kg) of cargo to the space station over the course of six mission, the first of which will begin in late 2021.

ULA Chief Executive Tory Bruno told reporters that "I have been a fan and a supporter and a cheerleader of this amazing vehicle from the first moment I saw it. To be able to make Vulcan's commercial debut with this block of missions underneath the Dream Chaser is just truly exciting." The first test flight is scheduled to begin in 2021, and if the Vulcan Centaur rocket isn't ready to launch by then, Bruno has said that they can always fall back on the already prepared Atlas V. "We're on time with Vulcan, but if something should arise, we're going to make sure that you fly when you're ready."

Continue reading: Dream Chaser Space Plane hitches ride on rocket for ISS cargo mission (full post)

NASA to reveal 2024 astronaut Moon Landing details, August 16th

Jak Connor | Aug 14, 2019 7:11 AM CDT

NASA has said that they will discussing their agency's plans for how astronauts will be landing on the Moon by 2024 on August 16th.

NASA to reveal 2024 astronaut Moon Landing details, August 16th | TweakTown.com

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine accompanied by U.S. Representatives Mo Brooks, Robert Aderholt, Scott DesJarlais and Brian Babin will be revealing the agency's plans for getting humans back on the Moon by 2024 through their Artemis program. The discussion will revolve around how NASA plans to safely land on the lunar surface, and questions and answers will be provided after the initial announcements.

NASA plan on getting the first women and the next man on the Moon in just five years time, this will be done through the Artemis program which is detailed here. Tune into the discussion on Friday, August 16th for more space information. If you didn't know, NASA just completed the final and most complex part of their Orion spacecraft, check that out here.

Continue reading: NASA to reveal 2024 astronaut Moon Landing details, August 16th (full post)

This 'soup' filled Neutron star glitched out and we have 'no idea why'

Jak Connor | Aug 14, 2019 6:10 AM CDT

Scientists have observed a recent neutron star phenomenon and have deemed it a 'glitch'. It seems that computers and technology aren't the only things that can freak out for no apparent reason.

This 'soup' filled Neutron star glitched out and we have 'no idea why' | TweakTown.com

Researchers who published a paper in the Nature Astronomy journal observed a neutron star called Vela glitching out for a short period of time. For those that don't know, neutron stars a fast-spinning corpses of once giant stars, they harbor about 1.5 times the mass of the sun and are much smaller in diameter. These stars are known to "glitch" out every now and again, this 'glitching' causes the star to slow down its rotation speed, then speed it up and then return back to normal speed.

According to the paper, Vela's normal spin speed is 11 times per second but in 2016 it was caught speeding up. Researchers discovered that Vela's spin has three phases, the first being the slowing down of the spin speed, then the speeding up phase and then a return to its normal speed. Researchers have also tried to determine the components that cause these three phases to occur and ultimately the "glitch" to happen. The components are: a crust of ions connected in a lattice pattern, a roiling "soup" of neutrons inside the stars inner crust and a extremely dense core consisting of protons, neutrons and more particles.

Continue reading: This 'soup' filled Neutron star glitched out and we have 'no idea why' (full post)

Milky Way's Black Hole just lit up 75 times more than normal, but why?

Jak Connor | Aug 14, 2019 5:08 AM CDT

For those that don't know, at the center of our Milky Way galaxy lies a black hole which we have named Sagittarius A. That black hole just had a strange anomaly that caused its brightness to spike 75 times more than normal.

Milky Way's Black Hole just lit up 75 times more than normal, but why? | TweakTown.com

The infrared flaring seen by astronomers is nothing like they have seen before, and astronomers have been observing Sagittarius A for about 20 years now. Astronomers used the Keck Telescope to observe the flaring and according to the scientists this flaring occurred for about 2.5 hours. At first, astronomers thought the flaring was caused by the neighboring star SO-2 which has an elliptical orbit close to the black hole, but that hasn't been confirmed.

An interview was held with ScienceAlert with astronomer Tuan Do, he said "The black hole was so bright I at first mistook it for the star S0-2, because I had never seen Sgr A* that bright. Over the next few frames, though, it was clear the source was variable and had to be the black hole. I knew almost right away there was probably something interesting going on with the black hole." At the moment scientists cannot pinpoint what has caused Sagittarius A to flare like this, further research will have to be conducted before a definitive answer can be provided. For more information and theories as to why the flaring occurred, visit this article here.

Continue reading: Milky Way's Black Hole just lit up 75 times more than normal, but why? (full post)

NASA capture space phenomenon 'Interplanetary Shock'

Jak Connor | Aug 13, 2019 3:04 AM CDT

NASA scientists have finally captured the first viewings of something they have been searching for years, solar 'Interplanetary Shock'.

NASA capture space phenomenon 'Interplanetary Shock' | TweakTown.com

NASA launched their Magnetospheric Multiscale mission back in 2015, the goal of the mission was to observe and study how the Sun's solar winds impact the Earth's magnetic fields. In January 2018, NASA scientists managed to capture this space phenomenon using the four launched spacecrafts, this phenomenon was an interplanetary shock.

An interplanetary shock is the transferring of solar energy (solar wind), this phenomenon occurs when a faster patch of solar wind overtakes a slower patch, resulting in the previously mentioned energy transfer, or 'shock'. Since a first time recording of this transfer has now been captured and saved, scientists hope that with this new information that they will be able to develop a better understanding of how it all works, while also hoping to be able to capture other space phenomena.

Continue reading: NASA capture space phenomenon 'Interplanetary Shock' (full post)

A black hole the size of our entire solar system discovered

Jak Connor | Aug 12, 2019 5:18 AM CDT

Astronomers have stumbled across a brand new black hole discovery that has shocked and stunned scientists at the sheer size of what they have witnessing.

A black hole the size of our entire solar system discovered 01

Astronomers have discovered a black hole sitting at the center of a super-giant elliptical galaxy called Holmberg 115A which is located about 700 million light years away. The black hole that is sitting at the center of this galaxy isn't the standard black hole, its actually about 40 billion times the mass of our Sun and has been observed by astronomers in Chile with the Very Large Telescope.

To put into perspective how big 40 billion times the mass of our Sun is, if this black hole was positioned where our Sun is now (at the center of our solar system) then its size would stretch out past Neptune and Pluto and into interstellar space. According to authors in the published paper, this black hole is "four to nine times larger than expected given the galaxy's bulge stellar mass and the galaxy's stellar velocity dispersion."

Continue reading: A black hole the size of our entire solar system discovered (full post)

Meteor SMASHES into Jupiter, so big we saw it from Earth

Jak Connor | Aug 12, 2019 3:13 AM CDT

Jupiter is simply massive and due to its size and gravitational pull a meteor has collided with the planet and the explosion was so big it was viewed from Earth.

Since Jupiter is so big, it's gravitational pull captures a lot of space debris including meteors that are abundantly floating around space. Astronomer, Ethan Chappel going under the guise of Chappel Astro on Twitter viewed the impact of the meteor and said "Today has felt completely unreal to me. Hoping someone else also recorded the impact to seal the deal."

Another group of astronomers estimated the meteors size, saying that the object was 16.5 feet to 65 feet in diameter and that meteors of this calibre collide with Jupiter between one and five times a month. Above we have a gif of the collision and we can see the impact in the bottom left hand corner of the gif. If you happened to miss last weeks news regarding Jupiter, the Hubble Space Telescope took the best image we have of Jupiter now, check that out here.

Continue reading: Meteor SMASHES into Jupiter, so big we saw it from Earth (full post)

Russian rocket explosion sparks fears of Chernobyl 2.0

Anthony Garreffa | Aug 11, 2019 11:13 PM CDT

Last week a video spread across social media of an explosion at a military facility, something that I saw myself but didn't have the time to sit down and write about it until now. First off, check out the video below which shows some pretty crazy stuff:

When I sat down to write this story I noticed it had been picked up by other media outlets, so I checked them all to see if they were showing the actual video of the explosion or simply reporting on it. Well, all I got were reports which make it seem much less severe than the video itself does. None of them have the video embedded.

Authorities have confirmed that the mysterious explosion at the Russian weapons testing range "involved radioactive materials". Rosatom, Russia's nuclear energy company, said in a statement on August 10 that five employees had died along with two military personnel.

Just like with Chernobyl, the Russian government has been very secretive with the exact details of what happened last week. Rosatom's statement simply said the deaths were "a result of an incident at a testing range in Arkhangelsk region".

In the nearby city of Severodvinsk, the explosion saw radiation levels skyrocket by 20x above normal rates for around half an hour. The city of 185,000 has reportedly been stocking up on iodine, which is used to reduce the effects of radiation exposure. Scary times, in a post-Chernobyl Russia (and post the HBO show Chernobyl, which was released just a couple of months ago).

Continue reading: Russian rocket explosion sparks fears of Chernobyl 2.0 (full post)

Here is the BEST picture we have of Jupiter, thanks Hubble

Jak Connor | Aug 9, 2019 8:03 AM CDT

NASA has released a brand new image from The Hubble Space Telescope showcasing what is now the best image we now have of the giant planet Jupiter.

Here is the BEST picture we have of Jupiter, thanks Hubble | TweakTown.com

From the image we can see Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot and the extremely chaotic atmostphere of the planet. The colors we can see on the planet showcase the different parts of Jupiter's atmosphere in action. From the distance we are at, we can see large bands covering the planets surface, these are ammonia ice cloud and the reason for them to be separated/different eachother is a result of various atmospheric pressures. Lighter bands have risen higher from the surface while the thicker bands represent more dense clouds.

The Great Red Spot we can see in the middle-right of the image is Jupiter's main attraction. Don't be fooled by the spots size, it may look small in the image but its diameter is actually larger than Earth's. The spot is actually a high-pressure wind system called an anticyclone and since the 1800's scientists have been watching it slowly downsize for an unknown reason. Jupiter's Great Red Spot is the largest anticyclonic storm in the entire solar system.

Continue reading: Here is the BEST picture we have of Jupiter, thanks Hubble (full post)

Astronauts plan to walk on Mars with this next-gen spacesuit

Jak Connor | Aug 9, 2019 5:09 AM CDT

A brand new next-generation spacesuit prototype has been created and could be what astronauts wear when they are traveling back to the Moon or better yet, to Mars.

Astronauts plan to walk on Mars with this next-gen spacesuit | TweakTown.com

ILC Dover and Collins Aerospace have worked together to develop the next-generation spacesuit that could take astronauts far and wide in our solar system. The new suit is called 'Astro' and features upgrades across the board when compared to the spacesuit that astronauts used to land on the Moon. According to the announcement, 'Astro' was designed and built with future crewed space missions in mind, these include the planned lunar landing by 2024 and even the future Mars landing.

The new 'Astro' suit boasts a number of improvements for the user, including mobility, improved carbon dioxide-removal tech that allows for longer missions, improved motors, electronics, torso size/design and much more. The suit also comes with a "life-support backpack" that will regulate pressure while also providing oxygen and cooling for the user. 'Astro' can be used for both spacewalks and surface walks by simply switching its mobility configuration.

Continue reading: Astronauts plan to walk on Mars with this next-gen spacesuit (full post)

Newsletter Subscription
Latest News
View More News
Latest Reviews
View More Reviews
Latest Articles
View More Articles