Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 317

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 317.

Foxconn to use robots in future assembly, starting with the new iPhone

Anthony Garreffa | Mon, Jul 7 2014 12:36 AM CDT

Foxconn should be one of the first companies to deploy robots to build consumer devices, with Apple reportedly being the first company to make use of these new "Foxbots" as they're referred to.

Foxconn to use robots in future assembly, starting with the new iPhone | TweakTown.com

These new Foxbots will be capable of assembling an average of 30,000 devices, costing somewhere between $20,000 to $25,000 per robot to make. Foxconn CEO Terry Gou has already said that these robots are in their final testing phase, with the company ready to unleash 10,000 robots into its factories. With Foxconn being the biggest partner for Apple in assembling its iOS-based devices like the iPhone, iPad and iPod, this could be big news for the Foxconn.

We already knew that Foxconn laid out plans to replace some of its human workers with some 1 million robots, but the time frame of this may shift. Apple is even chipping in, investing a hefty $10.5 billion on the advanced supply chain technology, with some of this investment sliding over to advanced machinery, something that includes assembly robots. Foxconn has hired an additional 100,000 new workers to help assemble the upcoming iPhone 6 for Apple, with production expected to ramp up next month for a launch in September.

Continue reading: Foxconn to use robots in future assembly, starting with the new iPhone (full post)

Danish, US donors to the rescue as UK faces sperm shortage

Tamlin Magee | Mon, Jun 30 2014 9:44 AM CDT

The United Kingdom is having to import sperm stocks from abroad due to a serious shortage of donors in Britain, the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority has warned.

Danish, US donors to the rescue as UK faces sperm shortage | TweakTown.com

According to a report from the group, imports make up almost a quarter of donated samples in Britain. It's thought that native donations dropped considerably thanks to the dropping of a clause that would have offered total anonymity to donors in 2005. Back in '05, imports made up just one in ten samples in Britain.

The majority of these are from the United States and Denmark, with the latter country being home to the biggest sperm bank in the world. You can check out the official British government records here, should you want to for any reason.

Continue reading: Danish, US donors to the rescue as UK faces sperm shortage (full post)

Scientists create supercooling system to keep organs fresh for days

Shane McGlaun | Mon, Jun 30 2014 9:01 AM CDT

One of the big challenges when it comes to performing organ transplants is to keep the organ fresh during the trip from the donor to the recipient. If the two live in different part of the country or world, keeping those organs fresh and viable can be difficult. Scientists have devised a new supercooling method that has the potential to keep the organs fresh for days.

Scientists create supercooling system to keep organs fresh for days | TweakTown.com

Currently organs can only remain fresh and viable for less than 24 hours during transportation. Scientists have developed a new supercooling process that in lab tests has shown to be able to keep a rat liver fresh and viable for three days.

The supercooling technique reportedly connects the organ to a machine that perfuses it with nutrients and cools it so minus 6C. The breakthrough could eventually lead to the ability to share donated organs around the world.

Continue reading: Scientists create supercooling system to keep organs fresh for days (full post)

Scientists plan on breeding bald, heat-resistant chickens

Tamlin Magee | Fri, Jun 27 2014 3:36 PM CDT

The inevitability of intensifying global warming isn't just a problem for humans - it's a problem for the world's livestock too. Now, to make chickens a little less susceptible to the heat, one team of scientists has started research to breed poultry that are born bald.

Scientists plan on breeding bald, heat-resistant chickens | TweakTown.com

Carl Schmidt, a geneticist at the University of Delaware, is embarking on a mission to Uganda and Brazil, where chickens have naturally shed their feathers over the years, according to Gizmodo UK. Schmidt's worried about feeding the world by 2050, adding that it'll be made even worse "if the climate does continue to change."

"We're going to be seeing heat waves that are both hotter and longer," Schmidt said in an interview with Modern Farmer. "We need to learn how to mitigate the effect of climate change on animals - we need to figure out how to help them adapt to it." For now, Schmidt plans a programme of selective breeding rather than alterations to their core genetics. But as well as breeding a whole new race of heat-resistant super-chickens, Schmidt and the team are also investigating other elements of selective pressure. "We're isolating the genetic variants that have allowed them to survive," Schmidt said.

Continue reading: Scientists plan on breeding bald, heat-resistant chickens (full post)

Scientists say after spending $10 billion: the universe doesn't exist

Anthony Garreffa | Fri, Jun 27 2014 3:35 AM CDT

Just minutes after the Big Bang, scientists theorize that the universe blinked itself out of existence - that's the current, new theory, anyway. After spending $10 billion, decades of research and tests, and the world's largest particle accelerator, scientists theorize the universe itself doesn't exist, or that it shouldn't exist.

Scientists say after spending $10 billion: the universe doesn't exist 07 | TweakTown.com

One of the researchers said thanks to finding the Higgs Boson particle, it shows that the universe may have blinked out of existence moments after the Big Bang itself. This researcher continued: "This is an unacceptable prediction of the theory ... if this had happened, we wouldn't be around to discuss it!"

Australian astrophysicist Dr Alan Duffy says: "I love this idea of bringing together two discoveries found at the biggest extremes of size you can imagine. From studying the Higgs Boson at tiny scales much smaller than an atom to (potentially) measuring Inflation by searching into the distant past of our enormous universe".

Continue reading: Scientists say after spending $10 billion: the universe doesn't exist (full post)

Europe launches enormous civilian robotics programme

Tamlin Magee | Tue, Jun 3 2014 8:14 PM CDT

The European Commission has claimed it's launched the world's largest ever civilian research and innovation programme in robotics.

Europe launches enormous civilian robotics programme | TweakTown.com

Teaming with 180 companies and research groups under the umbrella of euRobotics, today saw the official announcement of the EU initiative - which will cover manufacturing, agriculture, health, transport, civil security and households. The initiative is called SPARC and aims to build and strengthen Europe's position in the worldwide robotics market.

In an official statement, the European Commission's VP Neelie Kroes said that Europe must "be a producer and not merely a consumer of robots."

Continue reading: Europe launches enormous civilian robotics programme (full post)

NASA and amateur astronomers work to put old satellite back on task

Shane McGlaun | Fri, May 23 2014 8:16 AM CDT

NASA and a group of amateur astronomers are working together to put an old satellite back on task. When the little satellite, known as ISEE-3, flies back by the Earth next month, scientists will have a short window to attempt to communicate with the old satellite and get it back to work on its original mission. The problem for NASA with getting the satellite back on task was that it didn't have the resources to take on the project due to a tight budget.

NASA and amateur astronomers work to put old satellite back on task | TweakTown.com

Amateur scientists stepped up and took up the challenge of communicating with the satellite. NASA has endorsed the group, known as ISEE-3 Reboot Project. The original mission for the satellite was created in the Carter Administration. ISEE-3 stands for International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 and was launched in 1978.

Continue reading: NASA and amateur astronomers work to put old satellite back on task (full post)

SETI researchers claim alien life could be discovered in next 20 years

Shane McGlaun | Thu, May 22 2014 9:02 AM CDT

NASA and many other organizations are searching the universe for evidence that life exists on other planets. while the near term search is focusing on looking on and under the surface of Mars and other planets in our solar system, other researchers are looking much further away.

SETI researchers claim alien life could be discovered in next 20 years | TweakTown.com

One of the planets being closely looked at for signs of possible life is called Kepler-186f. This is the first validated Earth-size planet to orbit a distant star in the habitable zone. That means it is the right distance from the sun for liquid water to pool on the surface.

Continue reading: SETI researchers claim alien life could be discovered in next 20 years (full post)

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is shrinking after 100 years of domination

Charles Gantt | Fri, May 16 2014 12:06 PM CDT

For more than 100 years now, astronomers have gazed into space and attempted to figure out what fuels the massive hurricane-like storm that orbits just below Jupiter's equator. During the 1800's the storm was estimated to measure more than 25,000 miles across, and recent images from the Hubble Space Telescope show that it is just a mere 10,250 miles across today. To put that into perspective, back in 1890, three Earth's could fit inside the storm, and today only one would could squeeze in.

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is shrinking after 100 years of domination | TweakTown.com

At the moment, scientist have no conclusive theory on why the storm is shrinking, it has been able to figure out that the storm is shrinking faster as they years go by, and that it is currently losing about 580 miles in diameter per year. One early theory suggest that Jupiter's atmosphere is losing some of its volatility and bleeding off energy, which in turn is causing the storm to slowly die down.

Continue reading: Jupiter's Great Red Spot is shrinking after 100 years of domination (full post)

Elon Musk to help fund Nikola Tesla Museum thanks to The Oatmeal

Roshan Ashraf Shaikh | Wed, May 14 2014 10:46 PM CDT

According to reports, the CEO of Tesla Motors and SpaceX Elon Musk agreed to help fund the Nikola Tesla Museum, thanks to Matthew Inman's illustration in The Oatmeal.

Elon Musk to help fund Nikola Tesla Museum thanks to The Oatmeal | TweakTown.com

Inman led the fundraising via Indiegogo to bring up a museum based on Nikola Tesla's invention by using one of his facilities which was going to be torn down. Inman was able to successfully raise $1.5 million to buy the property in time. He needed to raise $8 million more so that the facility can be converted into a museum.

Recently he posted a two-part comic about owning a Tesla Model S. In part One he called it as a 'magical space car' and in Part 2, it was about asking Tesla Motor's Elon Musk to help him fund for the museum via twitter. Inman explained why it would be a good gesture for the electric car company to help fund this project.

Continue reading: Elon Musk to help fund Nikola Tesla Museum thanks to The Oatmeal (full post)

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