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Privacy & Rights News - Page 10

The latest and most important Privacy & Rights news - Page 10.

Ex-Microsoft privacy adviser doesn't trust MS after NSA PRISM leaks

Anthony Garreffa | Mon, Sep 30 2013 11:37 PM CDT

Caspar Bowden worked for Microsoft between 2002 and 2011 as its Chief Privacy Adviser, but now says he doesn't trust Microsoft's security after he read the stories about the NSA PRISM system after NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden stepped up with the leaks.

Ex-Microsoft privacy adviser doesn't trust MS after NSA PRISM leaks | TweakTown.com

Bowden was in control of the privacy policy for 40 countries that Microsoft operated in, but strangely he didn't have anything to do with the United States side of Microsoft's privacy. Bowden says he was simply unaware of the PRISM data-sharing network when he was with the software giant. He said "I don't trust Microsoft now," where he added that he now uses open source software that allows him to peer into the underlying code.

The former privacy adviser to Microsoft said that the NSA PRISM system was undermining democracy by sharing citizens' private information with the UK's GCHQ and intelligence agencies in Australia, New Zealand and Canada. He added: "The public now has to think about the fact that anybody in public life, or person in a position of influence in government, business or bureaucracy, now is thinking about what the NSA knows about them. So how can we trust that the decisions that they make are objective and that they aren't changing the decisions that they make to protect their career? That strikes at any system of representative government."

Continue reading: Ex-Microsoft privacy adviser doesn't trust MS after NSA PRISM leaks (full post)

John McAfee has a solution to our NSA spying problems, will cost $100

Charles Gantt | Mon, Sep 30 2013 10:31 AM CDT

John McAfee, modern day eccentric millionaire and founder of McAfee Antivirus, announced over the weekend that he has devised a plan to block the illegal--and legal--spying from the NSA once and for all. McAfee outlined his plan on Saturday while speaking at an event in San Jose, California.

John McAfee has a solution to our NSA spying problems, will cost $100 | TweakTown.com

The big plan involves a device created by McAfee which he calls "D-Central." The gadget is essentially a wireless networking hub that allows smartphones, tablets, laptops, and any other Wi-Fi connected device to access what is basically a darkweb-like network that blocks mainstream intrusion from the government. The D-Central device would retail for $100 or less and McAfee says that he has been planning the device for several years now.

D-Central will provide not only a private (darkweb) connection, but will provide a public one as well and can be used to share files, chat, and research without ever unveiling your identity. McAfee said that the device has a range of about three blocks, and at the moment D-Central "is round in shape" and features "no screens". A working prototype is said to be just six months away and McAfee is actively searching for partners to help with development. Anyone looking for more information can hit up the source below to check out the official D-Central website.

Continue reading: John McAfee has a solution to our NSA spying problems, will cost $100 (full post)

Dropbox asks for permission to publish gov surveillance requests

Charles Gantt | Tue, Sep 24 2013 4:32 PM CDT

Dropbox has jumped onto the transparency bandwagon with fellow tech giants such as Google, Microsoft, Twitter, and Facebook. Today, Dropbox announced that it has filed an amicus brief with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Dropbox asks for permission to publish gov surveillance requests | TweakTown.com

The brief requests that the court give permission to all Internet companies to disclose all requests for information regarding their users when it comes to matters of national security. This would allow Dropbox to publish a list of every information request it has received regarding its users from governments both foreign and domestic.

Dropbox says that "the Court should not permit the government to invoke the mere label of 'national security' to justify the speech restraints it seeks." Currently tech companies can publish how many requests they received, but only on non-gag law enforcement requests, and can only disclose a vague number range when dealing with national security requests.

Continue reading: Dropbox asks for permission to publish gov surveillance requests (full post)

NSA has no issues sharing your personal data with Israel

Anthony Garreffa | Thu, Sep 12 2013 5:29 AM CDT

On September 11 of all days, a new leak from Edward Snowden has appeared online thanks to The Guardian, which reports that the NSA shares raw intelligence data with Israel without sifting through it first.

NSA has no issues sharing your personal data with Israel | TweakTown.com

Snowden revealed the startling news, with an intelligence-sharing agreement detailed in a memorandum of understanding between the US spy agency and its Israel counterpart. This has unveiled that the NSA hands over intercepted communications that would contain American citizens' phone call records and e-mails (and most likely much, much more). The agreement between the spy agencies has no legally binding limits on the use of the data by the Israelis.

The deal was inked back in March 2009, with the agreement between the US and Israeli spy agencies "pertaining to the protection of US persons" repeatedly stressing the constitutional rights of Americans to privacy, as well as the need for Israeli intelligence staff to 'respect these rights.' The agreement saw the Israeli spy agency with "raw Sigint", which is signal intelligence.

Continue reading: NSA has no issues sharing your personal data with Israel (full post)

NSA has hacked into Android, BlackBerry and iPhones, accessed data

Anthony Garreffa | Mon, Sep 9 2013 3:28 AM CDT

Der Spiegel is at it again, reporting that it has NSA documents in its hands that state that the US spy agency accessed data from Apple iPhones, BlackBerry devices and Android-based devices.

NSA has hacked into Android, BlackBerry and iPhones, accessed data | TweakTown.com

Der Spigel stated that most smartphone data can be accessed, including users' contact lists, text message logs and information on geographical locations. The NSA has set up working parties that makes sure each of the main mobile OS' had a "back door" that was accessible to spies. This has stirred memories in Germany, where the paper is based, of the Nazis and the communist era from decades ago.

The one company that has the most at stake would be BlackBerry, who has proudly sold devices on the fact that they the encryption in them is too strong for anyone to crack. Google and Apple, we both know have worked with the NSA previously, so this news should come as a shock to no one. This news also comes on the heels of our latest report where we talked about common encryption protocols were nothing for the NSA.

Continue reading: NSA has hacked into Android, BlackBerry and iPhones, accessed data (full post)

US Government is Facebook's largest requester of user information

Charles Gantt | Wed, Aug 28 2013 1:05 PM CDT

Today, Facebook revealed that the US government accounts for the vast majority of the requests for information it receives about its subscribers. The social network said that it was legally required to comply with 79 percent of the 12,000 requests it received from the US government about 21,000 individuals who have profiles on the website.

US Government is Facebook's largest requester of user information | TweakTown.com

The US government is not the only guilty party though, as the UK government submitted about 2000 requests on over 2300 Facebook users, which it was obligated to turn over 68 percent of the requests. On the lower-end of the spectrum, Australia requested info on 601 users, of which 64 percent were granted. Facebook chose to release this information in an effort to be transparent after accusations of being close partners with the NSA in the infamous PRISM scandal.

In a blog post, Facebook's general counsel, Colin Stretch, wrote: "As we have made clear in recent weeks, we have stringent processes in place to handle all government data requests... We believe this process protects the data of the people who use our service, and requires governments to meet a very high legal bar with each individual request in order to receive any information about any of our users."

Continue reading: US Government is Facebook's largest requester of user information (full post)

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