Drones News - Page 6

The latest and most important Drones news - Page 6.

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A drone versus the McLaren 650s supercar is one serious battle

Chris Smith | Mar 7, 2016 10:33 AM CST

Set as an advertisement for the upcoming World Drone Prix set to kick off in Dubai, the marketing team for this event has released an awesome video depicting a race between a drone and the McLaren 650s supercar.

A drone versus the McLaren 650s supercar is one serious battle

Spotted on Gizmodo, we're told that a straight line drag race between these vehicles would be a fruitless venture, but the twists and turns of a drone race actually gives this remote controlled 'rocket' a chance.

This isn't me telling you that travelling to work at over 100mph by drone is going to be the next best thing, but it's something cool to think about at least. If you're a little short on cash and can't pick up a McLaren 650s as your Sunday driver, maybe a pocket rocket drone is more up your alley.

Continue reading: A drone versus the McLaren 650s supercar is one serious battle (full post)

Area 51 airspace breached by ballsy drone pilot

Ben Gourlay | Feb 18, 2016 4:03 PM CST

So what exactly goes on at Area 51 in the Nevada desert these days? Well, we're no closer to the truth, but thanks to one incredibly ballsy drone pilot, we've got some new views over some of the world's most restricted airspace.

Area 51 airspace breached by ballsy drone pilot

Pilot Hans Faulkner sent his drone up over a number of locations at the secretive base, North West Gate, and the Groom Lake from South Gate - a historically significant site which served as the airspace for some of the experimental aircraft and which the pilot uploaded to his YouTube channel.

Faulkner described the spot as "very difficult to move around" and that "white trucks follow us and hide when we record them". My hat's off to you, Hans.

Continue reading: Area 51 airspace breached by ballsy drone pilot (full post)

Dutch police training eagles to intercept drones

Sean Ridgeley | Feb 1, 2016 3:02 PM CST

Drones have become popular and cheap enough that their misuse and subsequent danger -- like when obstructing an air ambulance from landing -- is becoming a problem for Dutch police. Though they are investigating conventional methods to deal with it, they are also electing to train eagles to identify and capture them.

Dutch police training eagles to intercept drones

To this end, the "Politie Nederland" are teaming up with Guard From Above, a company that trains raptors. It's entirely possible things will go smoothly, as eagles are formidable birds of prey that already take down drones on their own, as well as handgliders, going so far as to take bites out of them afterward. Small drones seem fine, but larger ones could pose serious harm to the birds, so the impact on claws and a protection system and are being investigated by GFA (we're going to go ahead and assume it'll end up something like this).

Continue reading: Dutch police training eagles to intercept drones (full post)

Droners might have to get insurance, leave your info after an accident

Jeff Williams | Jan 15, 2016 12:04 PM CST

There are two bills sitting in the California State legislature that could change the future of drones in that state, and probably beyond. These laws, if they pass, would require you to register with the state, have a tiny physical or electronic license plate and have insurance for damage to property and for hurting people too.

The first bill is is just a requirement for a small amount of property and personal insurance should injuries or damage accidentally occurs. It might even eventually evolve as a natural extension of auto insurance, though in this case it's a small policy bought at the point you bought the drone. That bill also requires GPS enabled drones to have an auto shut-off feature enabled that'll shut drones down when they approach airports. A necessary function, unfortunately.

The second bill wants to help curb future hit and run type accidents, with a state registration system similar to what we already have for cars. This would also require pilots to leave their information, much as with a car accident, in a conspicuous place after the fact, or face legal consequences. This should help place more responsibility on the drone pilot themselves.

Continue reading: Droners might have to get insurance, leave your info after an accident (full post)

Recreational drone literally pokes UK toddler's eye out

Derek Strickland | Nov 30, 2015 2:51 PM CST

Remember when everyone told Ralphie in the Christmas Story he shouldn't get a BB gun because he'll just "shoot his eye out", and lo and behold, the first thing he did with his Red Ryder was blast a BB into his eye? A recent accident might make you rethink your plans to become a drone enthusiast, as it's been proven those unmanned fliers can be pretty hazardous.

Recreational drone literally pokes UK toddler's eye out

According to the BBC, the blades of a recreational drone sliced an 18-month-old toddler's eye in half after the pilot lost control of the vehicle. "It was up for about 60 seconds," said Simon Evans, a family friend who was operating the drone. "As I brought it back down to land, it just clipped the tree and span round. The next thing I know I've just heard my friend shriek and say 'Oh God no' and I turned around and just saw blood and his baby on the floor crying."

Despite being a seasoned pilot, Simons was unable to keep the UAV from crashing into the toddler. The boy, Oscar Webb, will have to wait before he can get surgery and an artificial eye. The accident will serve as a cautionary tale to parents everywhere and may very well have lasting implications for the future of drones.

Continue reading: Recreational drone literally pokes UK toddler's eye out (full post)

Amazon's new Prime Air drones deliver packages in 30 minutes or less

Derek Strickland | Nov 30, 2015 7:18 AM CST

After months of speculation and rumors, the internet's most popular e-tailer has finally taken to the skies with a fleet of delivery drones that may usher in a new level of convenience.

Amazon's new Prime Air drones deliver packages in 30 minutes or less

As explained by Jeremy Clarkson, Amazon's new Prime Air delivery service taps the power of autonomous drones in order to ship packages in 30 minutes or less. The drones themselves are quite advanced, using "sophisticated sense-and-avoid technology" to detect and avoid nearby obstacles in the sky, and even scans the landing zone to ensure safe deliveries. The drones can fly up to 400 feet at 55 miles-per-hour, and can deliver 5-pound packages--things like DVD's, games, CD's and even shoes--in a 15-mile radius.

Amazon notes that the Prime Air service isn't ready for deployment, and the drones are still being manufactured and developed. "We are testing many different vehicle designs, and delivery mechanisms to discover how best to deliver packages in a variety of environments," reads the official Q&A. The company plans to offer Prime Air in the United States, the United Kingdom and Israel to start, with other territories to follow.

Continue reading: Amazon's new Prime Air drones deliver packages in 30 minutes or less (full post)

US military, law enforcement developing counter-drone systems

Michael Hatamoto | Aug 20, 2015 3:17 PM CDT

It looks like the US government and police agencies are looking for some type of counter-drone system, able to protect vulnerable sites from rogue drones.

One test conducted by the New York Police Department relied on a microwave-based system designed to send the drone back to its operator. There were problems with the test, such as interference from local media broadcasts. Even though trying to shoot down drones would be fairly simplistic, it leads to public safety hazards - and there is more interesting in finding ways to send drones directly back to the operator.

"We can't shoot it out of the sky," said a source speaking to Reuters. "We have to come up with something that's kind of basic technology so that if something happens, the drone or device will just go right back to the operators. It won't crash."

Continue reading: US military, law enforcement developing counter-drone systems (full post)

US military wants to increase number of drone flights... everywhere

Michael Hatamoto | Aug 18, 2015 2:30 PM CDT

The US government plans to expand UAV flights over the next few years, expanding daily drone sortie operations away from just the Air Force, according to officials.

The number of UAV flights will increase from around 60 every day up to 90 by 2019, though there are significant manpower and financial budget issues that must be addressed.

The global demand for UAV flights must expand, as the Air Force fleet continues to face trained pilot shortages. As the US combat mission in Afghanistan finally came to an end, the US military planned on reducing the number of combat drone flights by its Air Force staff. However, the rapid rise of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq has caused an uptick in reconnaissance and targeted strikes.

Continue reading: US military wants to increase number of drone flights... everywhere (full post)

Fight erupts after drone drops narcotics into prison yard

Michael Hatamoto | Aug 4, 2015 4:44 PM CDT

A drone dropped a bundle of narcotics and tobacco into the Mansfield Correctional Institution, located southwest of Cleveland, Ohio. The incident left nine people in solitary confinement for fighting over control of the contraband.

The delivery included more than five ounces of tobacco, over two ounces of marijuana, and about one-quarter ounce of heroin, according to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. The package was dropped on the north recreation yard, and was thrown into the south recreation yard as inmates fought.

All inmates in both the north recreation and south recreation yards underwent mandatory strip searches and clinic checks.

Continue reading: Fight erupts after drone drops narcotics into prison yard (full post)

US National Guard using Reaper drone to search for missing person

Michael Hatamoto | Jul 30, 2015 2:04 PM CDT

The California National Guard is using an MQ-9 Reaper drone in the search for Edward Kavanaugh, a person missing since July 17 riding a motorcycle in Northern California.

The drone can collect real-time images, so ground units have a better idea on where to search while looking for Kavanaugh. So far, the hunt in El Dorado County has not turned up anything, even with the drone's assistance.

The California National Guard previously used a drone to help fight the Rim Fire in 2013 - as it has special abilities, including infrared sensors, image-intensified cameras, and the ability to stay in the air longer than helicopters and traditional aircraft.

Continue reading: US National Guard using Reaper drone to search for missing person (full post)