CPU, APU & Chipsets News - Page 148

All the latest CPU and chipset news, with everything related to Intel and AMD processors & plenty more - Page 148.

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Intel to launch its new 10nm CPUs in early 2017

Anthony Garreffa | Feb 5, 2015 5:44 PM CST

Intel is expected to unveil its new 10nm processors sometime in early 2017, with the news coming from Intel's GM for the Middle East and North Africa region, Taha Khalifa.

Khalifa, when talking about the new Intel CPUs, said: "We have been consistently pursuing Moore's Law and this has been the core of our innovation for the last 40 years. The 10nm chips are expected to be launched early 2017". When it comes to this year though, we should expect Intel to unveil its new 14nm Skylake processors in the second half of the year.

Intel was originally meant to roll out its 14nm processors in late 2013, but there were various technical setbacks with the Broadwell architecture, which was eventually delayed into 2014. This has pushed back the rest of Intel's upcoming processors, with the 10nm-based Skylake being included. Intel will most likely unveil tablet and mobile parts under its 10nm umbrella, before moving it into the desktop family in the later parts of 2017.

Continue reading: Intel to launch its new 10nm CPUs in early 2017 (full post)

Media consumption workloads mean a strong push for x86 processors

Chris Smith | Dec 14, 2014 5:09 AM CST

As according to a newly issued press release by ABI Research, there has been a major push for higher-workload media stations in today's climate - pushing these system to receive upgraded hardware including x86 processing units.

This comes paired with a foretasted an x86 processor growth from 43% market share in 2013 to a much larger 51% in 2020. This is coupled with higher levels of semiconductor integration, seeing Systems on Chips being merged x86 or ARM processors with DSPs becoming standard practice.

These new advanced media products have seen vast visualization improvements in recent years, with Sam Rosen, Practice Director for TV & Video, claiming "Cloud video workflows, such as that developed by Elemental and EVS for the FIFA World Cup, place a high priority on software flexibility" expressing a much-needed hardware upgrade for existing technology.

Continue reading: Media consumption workloads mean a strong push for x86 processors (full post)

China rapidly expanding semiconductor production capability

Paul Alcorn | Dec 4, 2014 2:43 PM CST

China is a rising economic superpower that lacks one key ingredient to acquire their goal of complete self-sufficiency; the all-important processor. China has over 1.3 billion mobile phone users, but imports over 90% of their processors. This adds up to a whopping annual total of $232 billion in imported chips. China consumes over 45% of the worldwide chip production, and the lack of semiconductor technology is a huge strategic gap.

To that end, China has invested an unprecedented $5 billion in the last 18 months on procuring semiconductor-related companies, and that is just the beginning. These investments are largely funded by the Chinese government, and they have pledged to spend up to $163 billion over the next 5 to 10 years to reduce their reliance upon foreign chips. China is moving aggressively, and has plans to boost 2013 semiconductor revenue 40% by the end of next year.

Chip production has many advantages that extend far beyond cellular phone production. The wars of today are increasingly powered by technology, and this reliance is only going to increase in the future. If China became involved in a protracted dispute, and found itself on the unfriendly side of a blockade or sanctions, simply cutting off CPU supply could simultaneously cripple their economy and military. A major thorn in China's side is also the fact that over 25% of their processor supply originates in Taiwan. The continued animosity between the two countries only adds fuel to China's desire to produce their own chips.

Continue reading: China rapidly expanding semiconductor production capability (full post)

Intel to hit 10nm in 2016, with 7nm CPUs arriving in 2018

Anthony Garreffa | Dec 1, 2014 2:37 AM CST

Just nine years ago Intel was sitting at 65nm CPUs, reaching 22nm just three years ago now. We've been enjoying 14nm CPUs since last year, but now it's time to move onto 10nm, 7nm and beyond.

Broadwell arrived as the Core M processor, but for the 14nm desktop CPUs, we will be waiting until sometime in 2015. After the 14nm-based desktop Broadwell processors arrive, we have to look forward to 10nm sometime late next year or possibly 2016, while 7nm is planned for 2017 or so. The 10nm node is going to be an interesting transition, as the semiconductor industry will have to upgrade to EUVL technology.

While Intel edges closer to 14nm on the desktop, with 10nm now in its sights, what about AMD? AMD are currently using the 28nm process, which will be used throughout most of 2015, as they rely on fabrication plants like GlobalFoundries and TSMC do to their bidding. Intel could Tick-Tock ahead a few notches in that time, that's for sure.

Continue reading: Intel to hit 10nm in 2016, with 7nm CPUs arriving in 2018 (full post)

AMD want their APUs in 2020 to feature 25x the energy efficiency

Anthony Garreffa | Nov 30, 2014 4:03 AM CST

AMD is hoping for some serious improvements in the energy efficiency of its APUs by 2020, where the chipmaker is aiming for a massive 25x improvement. In order to reach this goal, AMD will have to outpace historical energy efficiency by over 70%, but the company is optimistic that it can do this.

The company has goals in terms of energy efficiency, where it wants to have "more performance with less power", as well as "long battery life, sleek light weight form factors, cool and quiet computation" mixed with "lower energy consumption and utility bills, lower Total Cost of Ownership" and a "reduced environmental impact".

Using a comparison of a 35W notebook processor released this year, versus a 35W processor from two years ago, the new notebook processor is twice as fast. You can say that the energy efficiency has improved by 200% as well, but the older 35W processors no longer fit into notebooks. AMD needs to find a way to reduce power consumption, as well as increasing the performance of the processor. Up until now, we've seen Intel and AMD do one or the other, but not both to the extent of 200% leaps each time.

Continue reading: AMD want their APUs in 2020 to feature 25x the energy efficiency (full post)

Intel unleash amazing employee benefit sale

Chris Smith | Nov 21, 2014 10:02 PM CST

Intel's Retail Edge Program's end-of-year benefits have been released. If you're an employee of certain technology companies (mobile phones included), you can join up to this project and reap the sale rewards. This information has been provided through Chiphell's online forum.

There are two main deals on offer, seeing Intel clear out their Core i7-5930K 3.5 GHz processor's for as low as $159 US, alongside their Core i7-4790K 4.0 GHz for a crazy $79 US.

If you think you're eligible for this program, you can register through your employee's certification to the Intel sales network. Once tasks are completed, you add 'points' to your account, allowing you to reach certain levels of discounts ranging from Producer, to Rockstar and finally Rock Legend - providing the best pricing.

Continue reading: Intel unleash amazing employee benefit sale (full post)

Intel teases its Haswell-EX processor, which will feature 36 threads

Anthony Garreffa | Nov 20, 2014 7:11 PM CST

During the 2015 IEEE international Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in February 2015, Intel will reveal more technical details about its upcoming Haswell-EX processor. This processor will be the most complex CPU the company has ever made.

Intel's Xeon E7 v3 "Haswell-EX" processor will work in motherboards with up to eight sockets, packing 18 cores (and 18 Hyper-Threaded cores) for a total of 36 threads per CPU. We will also have 45MB of last-level cache (LLC), quad-channel DDR4 support, PCI Express 3.0 and much more. The new Intel Xeon E7 platform will usher in new reliability, availability, scalability (RAS) capabilities, something that will bring Intel closer to the older Itanium-based servers.

The Haswell-EX processor will be using Intel's 22nm Tri-Gate technology, packing in an insane 5.56 billion transistors, making it one of the most complex x86-based processors ever made.

Continue reading: Intel teases its Haswell-EX processor, which will feature 36 threads (full post)

Intel giving $15 cash to those who purchased Pentium 4 powered PCs

Roshan Ashraf Shaikh | Nov 5, 2014 6:35 PM CST

As a result of a class-action lawsuit against HP and Intel, the chipmaker will have to give $15 to those who have purchased an Intel Pentium 4 processor about 15 years ago.

As of now, this applies to those who are residing in the United States and have purchased computers for personal/general use with Intel Pentium 4 processors between November 20, 2000 and June 30, 2002. The lawsuit points out that Intel and HP have deliberately manipulated benchmark scores for the Intel Pentium 4 processors at the time it was facing tough rivalry from AMD. There were also allegations that Intel Pentium III and AMD Athlon line ups at the time performed better in comparison to Pentium 4 line ups.

The lawsuit states that Intel secretly wrote benchmarks which would favour Pentium 4 processors. The company also paid software companies to make changes to favour Pentium 4's performance scores for third-party benchmark software, so that it will stand out against AMD. The benchmarks that were in question were WebMark2001 and SysMark 2001. Both companies have denied these allegations but said that they were willing to settle the matter via compensation. You do not require to show a purchase invoice that you've bought a Pentium 4 powered PC during that time frame, but you will need to present some proof such as the retailer's details and date of purchase.

Continue reading: Intel giving $15 cash to those who purchased Pentium 4 powered PCs (full post)

Intel begins teasing its next-gen Broadwell-E CPUs, not out until 2016

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 24, 2014 8:27 PM CDT

Intel may have just launched its Haswell-E and X99 platform, but that doesn't stop the chipmaker from teasing its upcoming HEDT (high-end desktop) processor train from slowing down. We're now hearing about the next-gen HEDT tech, Broadwell-E, which will be based on Intel's 14nm technology, using the same LGA2011v3 package.

The new CPU will not be an architectural change, but it will provide smaller changes over what we have with the current Haswell-E processors. The new Core i7 Broadwell-E will be built on Intel's 14nm process, and will feature between 6 and 8 cores based on their, you guessed it, Broadwell microarchitecture. These cores will feature up to 20MB of L3 cache, and is pin-compatible with current Haswell-E, meaning we have quad-channel DDR4, too.

Intel could provide the full 40-lane PCIe interface, instead of the cut down 28-lane PCIe interface that the entry-level HEDT currently has. We should expect a 140W TDP, even with the die shrink, when the Broadwell-E processors launch in 2016.

Continue reading: Intel begins teasing its next-gen Broadwell-E CPUs, not out until 2016 (full post)

Next-gen AMD APU 'Carrizo-L' to be available in December

Roshan Ashraf Shaikh | Oct 8, 2014 11:27 AM CDT

AMD would be announcing its next generation notebook APU Carrizo-L in December. The processor is based on a 28nm quad-core architecture based on their Excavator core.

The notebook APU will have support for 2133MHz DDR3 memory. The news reported pointed out that Carrizo-L will succeed AMD's Beem and Mullins APU which is currently positioned for entry-level notebooks and tablets. It was also pointed out that this will also be 'officially' compatible with Windows 10. The rest of the operating systems, such as Windows 8.1, Ubuntu and SLED operating systems were added on the list.

The APU is designed for entry-level notebooks and will be placed to compete against Intel Pentium and Celeron series processors. But as far as mainstream segment is concerned, AMD would not be releasing the full-fledged Carrizo APU before March 2015 which will be succeeding after the long running Kaveri APUs. According to another report, Carrizo will be supporting both DDR3 and DDR4 along with an on-package memory die. It is also speculated that Carrizo series will have a desktop APU variant, which will be using the existing FM2+ socket motherboards. The expected timeframe for the desktop variant is also assumed for March 2015 launch.

Continue reading: Next-gen AMD APU 'Carrizo-L' to be available in December (full post)