Chinese migrants are using TikTok videos to easily sneak into the US

Chinese migrants are sneaking into the United States through the Mexican border by using TikTok videos that are guides on where to go.

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Chinese migrants are flocking to the United States through the Mexican border, and according to a recent report by 60 Minutes, most are using TikTok as their guide to locate passages that are unguarded.

In a new video posted to the 60 Minutes YouTube channel, CBS journalists observed nearly 600 migrants crossing the border through a small gap located at the end of one of the border fences near San Diego. Some of the migrants who passed through the border spoke to 60 Minutes and were asked how they knew about the small gap in the fence, to which they replied they were informed of the location via multiple videos on TikTok.

Journalists working on the story said they reviewed some of these videos, which gave detailed instructions on how migrants can hire Mexican smugglers and where the gap in the border is located. Notably, some of these migrants were required to travel through multiple countries to make it through this very gap, with some stating they had to travel through Turkey, Ecuador, Colombia, Panama, and then Mexico.

Notably, these TikTok videos informed migrants how to contact Mexican smugglers, who then charge each migrant a hefty fee for transportation to the gap located at the end of the fence.

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Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science, space, and artificial intelligence news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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