Not seeing Copilot in Windows 11 yet? Microsoft explains why some users still don't have the AI

Microsoft has explained why Windows 11's Copilot AI isn't available to everyone across the globe yet - although that will change in time.

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Windows 11 recently got the Copilot feature courtesy of Microsoft's Moment 4 update which rolled out at the end of September, but not everyone has the AI.

Copilot sits in a side-bar in Windows 11 - for those who have it (Image Credit: Microsoft)

Copilot sits in a side-bar in Windows 11 - for those who have it (Image Credit: Microsoft)

In actual fact, there are a couple of reasons you might not have Copilot, but what Microsoft has just confirmed is that there are certain regions which just aren't getting the AI - at least not yet - at all.

Only Windows 11 users in the US, UK, and some Asian and South American countries are getting Copilot rolled out to the finished version of the desktop OS.

Microsoft did, however, tell Windows Latest that the plan is to add additional markets over time, so don't give up hope if you're outside of these regions.

Rolling out the AI isn't as simple as the average Windows 11 feature, that's for sure. Europe, to pick an obvious example, is a thorny area for Microsoft in terms of bringing out Copilot due to potential privacy issues with European regulations. There may be similar concerns elsewhere, too, but clearly Microsoft intends for a wider rollout of Copilot down the line.

Even if you are in one of the mentioned areas where Copilot is available, you may not see the AI debut on your desktop for another reason. Folks who haven't ticked the 'Get the latest updates as soon as they're available' won't be first in the queue to get the AI, either.

Whether or not you need Copilot, mind, is another matter. While it is indeed rolling out to the finished version of Windows 11, the AI is still in its relatively early stages of development.

In short, don't expect too much, certainly not in the way of being able to work with Windows settings and the like - the powers of Copilot are still pretty thin on the ground in that respect. It's mostly just a glorified Bing chatbot in a Windows 11 side-bar at this stage.

We're expecting Windows 12, or whatever it ends up being called, to be built around the AI - and maybe even named after it, when the next iteration of the OS arrives in 2024.

How successful Copilot is, and how well the AI is received, will not only depend on how thoroughly Microsoft can flesh out the capabilities whereby people can use the AI to directly interact with the Windows environment in a much easier way. What will also be crucial in our opinion is whether Microsoft tries to force ads on folks via Copilot, which clearly won't go down well.

Darren has written for numerous magazines and websites in the technology world for almost 30 years, including TechRadar, PC Gamer, Eurogamer, Computeractive, and many more. He worked on his first magazine (PC Home) long before Google and most of the rest of the web existed. In his spare time, he can be found gaming, going to the gym, and writing books (his debut novel – ‘I Know What You Did Last Supper’ – was published by Hachette UK in 2013).

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