New jaw-dropping Mars images showcase the Red Planet's complex history

A new set of images of Mars look like someone has run their fingernails across the surface of the Red Planet to create trenches.

Published May 12, 2022 1:11 AM CDT   |   Updated Wed, Jun 1 2022 4:33 PM CDT
1 minute & 12 seconds read time

The European Space Agency (ESA) has taken to its website to showcase new images of Mars and its network of long grooves in its surface.

New jaw-dropping Mars images showcase the Red Planet's complex history 03 | TweakTown.com

Posted to the ESA website on April 28, 2022, the space agency explains that the features seen in the above image are involved in a large fault system that is called Tantalus Fossae. The Tantalus Fossae was formed when the nearby Alba Mons volcano rose out of the ground.

The indents on Mars' surface are called "grabens" and are also present on the other side of the volcano. These grabens stretch as far as 621 miles, and can be up to 6 miles wide and 1,100 feet deep. Below is a topographical view of the region, which displays a legend that indicates the depth of the terrain in meters. Red terrain is far lower than the terrain in the northern right-hand corner of the image.

New jaw-dropping Mars images showcase the Red Planet's complex history 02 | TweakTown.com

"This area is named after Tantalus, a son of Zeus and Plouto who, according to Greek legend, betrayed the gods and was forced by Hades to stand in water beneath a fruit tree. When he tried to drink the water retreated, and when he tried to eat the branches moved beyond his reach - a punishment known as the torments of Tantalus," wrote the ESA.

New jaw-dropping Mars images showcase the Red Planet's complex history 01 | TweakTown.com

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Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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