NASA reveals how you can soon watch Jupiter and Venus 'nearly collide'

This weekend there will be planetary conjunction that will feature Venus and Jupiter appearing to 'nearly collide,' says NASA.

@JakConnorTT
Published Fri, Apr 29 2022 1:03 AM CDT   |   Updated Sat, May 21 2022 2:55 PM CDT

In the first few days of this month, NASA outlines what skywatchers can expect out of the month of April, and to close out the last few days of April, skywatchers can expect a planetary conjunction.

As explained in NASA's blog post from April 1, Jupiter and Venus will be meeting in a planetary conjunction on the morning of April 30. Skywatchers will see what appears to be the two planets colliding into each other due to the glare. As the conjunction reaches its pinnacle, both the planets will merge into one blur of light that will produce a "spectacular glow", according to NASA.

Notably, the space agency explains that the "merger" is actually an illusion as Venus and Jupiter are many millions of miles apart. This illusion is caused by an alignment of Jupiter, Venus, and Earth and only happens when the alignment is absolute. NASA also states that this magnificent celestial event will continue into the morning of May 1, but the positions of Jupiter and Venus will be reversed.

NASA reveals how you can soon watch Jupiter and Venus 'nearly collide' 01 | TweakTown.com
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If you are interested in checking out the celestial event for yourself and don't know how to locate the planets in the sky, it's advised that you download either a free or a paid skywatching app for your smartphone.

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NEWS SOURCE:blogs.nasa.gov

Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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