ESA captures detailed new images of Mars volcanoes and craters

ESA's Mars Express satellite has observed the Jovis Tholus shield volcano on the Martian surface along with a large nearby crater.

@AdamHuntTT
Published Fri, Jan 28 2022 1:00 AM CST   |   Updated Wed, Feb 23 2022 3:32 PM CST

The Mars Express satellite captured the images.

ESA captures detailed new images of Mars volcanoes and craters 01 | TweakTown.com
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The Mars Express is a space mission launched in 2003 and operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). Now, it has observed the Jovis Tholus shield volcano on the Martian surface, spotting numerous craters peppering the volcano's caldera. Jovis Tholus peaks at 2,990 meters and spans about 58 kilometers. Slightly off to the east of Jovis Tholus, given away in the color-coded topography image below, is a less-developed volcano causing the surface to bulge somewhat.

A large impact crater is found to the north of the volcanoes, spanning 30 kilometers in width. The impactor, an asteroid or comet, likely struck water or ice-saturated ground, indicated by the fluidized nature of the ejected material around the crater and the fractured floor within the crater. What appears to be an outflow channel along the fault line to the northwest of the crater provides further evidence that this was a watery region in the past.

ESA captures detailed new images of Mars volcanoes and craters 02 | TweakTown.comESA captures detailed new images of Mars volcanoes and craters 03 | TweakTown.com
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NEWS SOURCES:esa.int, phys.org

Adam grew up watching his dad play Turok 2 and Age of Empires on a PC in his computer room, and learned a love for video games through him. Adam was always working with computers, which helped build his natural affinity for working with them, leading to him building his own at 14, after taking apart and tinkering with other old computers and tech lying around. Adam has always been very interested in STEM subjects, and is always trying to learn more about the world and the way it works.

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