Failed Russian rocket piece uncontrollably meteors back down to Earth

A failed Russian rocket part from the heavy-class launch vehicle Angara-A5 has uncontrollably plummeted back down to Earth.

@JakConnorTT
Published Fri, Jan 7 2022 1:33 AM CST   |   Updated Tue, Feb 1 2022 7:33 PM CST

Following yesterday's report confirming that a failed Russian rocket piece was hurdling uncontrollably back down to Earth, new reports state that the rocket piece has entered Earth's atmosphere.

Failed Russian rocket piece uncontrollably meteors back down to Earth 01 | TweakTown.com

The rocket part that has crashed back down to Earth is the upper stage of the Russian Angara A5 rocket tested on December 2021. The rocket was uncrewed and was also carrying a satellite. NBC reported that its engine malfunctioned shortly after the rocket was launched, causing it to remain stuck in low-Earth orbit before eventually falling back down to the surface.

On Wednesday, the four tons of material plummeted back down to Earth, entering Earth's atmosphere somewhere over the Pacific Ocean and landing in an unknown area. Jonathan McDowell, a Harvard astronomer, warned that four tons of material entering the atmosphere could pose a risk as not all of the material will burn up, some pieces may make it to the surface. However, McDowell noted that the majority of the planet is covered in ocean and that it's more likely that it would hit the sea than land, which it seems to have done.

Read more: This Russian rocket part is out-of-control, will crash into Earth soon

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Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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