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Boeing's new all-electric propulsion satellite goes into operation

Boeing has the world's first all-electric propulsion satellite

By Anthony Garreffa on Sep 15, 2015 02:23 am CDT - 0 mins, 50 secs reading time

Boeing has quite the exclusive on its hands, announcing the world's first satellite that uses an all-electric propulsion system. The new Boeing ABS-3A is a 4,300 pound telecommunications satellite will provide both C- and Ku-band service to South America, the Middle East and Africa.

Boeing's new all-electric propulsion satellite goes into operation | TweakTown.com

What makes Boeing's ABS-3A different than other satellites in orbit, is that the ABS-3A doesn't use tanks of inert gas for propulsion and orbit maintenance. This is where the all-electric technology comes into play, with Boeing using the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS) which blasts out a magnetic field to push ions around, generating thrust.

Boeing's ABS-3A will use just 11 pounds of Xenon annually, which is quite generous considering its 15-year operational lifespan. This is around one-tenth the amount of propellant that a normal satellite would require. The company launched its new ABS-3A abord the Falcon 9 rocket that launched in March, and handed over control to ABS-3A to its new owner, Asia Broadcast Satellite, last month.

Anthony Garreffa

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Anthony Garreffa

Anthony is a long time PC enthusiast with a passion of hate for games to be built around consoles. With FPS gaming since the pre-Quake days, where you were insulted if you used a mouse to aim, he has been addicted to gaming and hardware ever since. Working in IT retail for 10 years gave him great experience with high-end, custom-built PCs. His addiction to GPU technology is unwavering, and with next-gen NVIDIA GPUs about to launch alongside 4K 144Hz HDR G-Sync gaming monitors and BFGDs (65-inch 4K 120Hz HDR G-Sync TVs) there has never been a time to be more excited about technology.

NEWS SOURCE:engadget.com

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