Technology and gaming content trusted in North America and globally since 1999
8,619 Reviews & Articles | 61,088 News Posts

New Zealand High Court reverses decision to let Dotcom's legal team see full evidence against him

US prosecutors win appeal, Dotcom's legal team will only see summary of evidence

Charles Gantt | Mar 1, 2013 at 8:31 am CST (0 mins, 54 secs time to read)

In what can only be described as a weird turn of events, the New Zealand High Court has overturned a previous ruling that granted Kim Dotcom's legal team full access to all the evidence against their client before his extradition hearing later this year.

New Zealand High Court reverses decision to let Dotcom's legal team see full evidence against him | TweakTown.com

The initial ruling came from Judge David Harvey, who had to step down earlier this year, after making impartial comments relating to the case. This lead to the prosecution filing an appeal which was granted this morning. The new ruling was that since this was an extradition trial, and not a criminal trial, it did not merit the same considerations with regards to evidence.

Dotcom's team plans on taking its case to the New Zealand Supreme Court in an effort to settle this matter once and for all. The team is seeking to see all the evidence in the case in order to judge if any illegal measures were taken by the US and New Zealand governments in Dotcom's arrest. The team says that illegal warrants as well as illegal surveillance was carried out for months beforehand.

Last updated: Apr 7, 2020 at 11:32 am CDT

NEWS SOURCE:kitguru.net
Charles Gantt

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Charles Gantt

A web developer by day, Charles comes to TweakTown after a short break from the Tech Journalism world. Formerly the Editor in Chief at TheBestCaseScenario, he now writes Maker and DIY content. Charles is a self proclaimed Maker of Things and is a major supporter of the Maker movement. In his free time, Charles likes to build just about anything, with past projects ranging from custom PC cooling control systems to 3D printers. Other expensive addictions include Photography, Astronomy and Home Automation.

Related Tags