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Reebok and mc10 partner up to build head impact sensing CheckLight, helps diagnose concussions

Diagnosing concussions in Athletes just got easier, CheckLight is a wearable concussion detector.

@CharlesJGantt
Published Fri, Jan 11 2013 8:51 AM CST   |   Updated Mon, Oct 19 2020 8:14 PM CDT

Head trauma in sports has always been a major concern in impact sports. In 2012 we saw the NFL take a lot of heat over its current and former players experiencing multiple concussions. Reebok and mc10 have developed a wearable head impact detector that makes it easy for medical staff to see where the impact took place.

Reebok and mc10 partner up to build head impact sensing CheckLight, helps diagnose concussions | TweakTown.com

Called CheckLight, the device resembles a skull cap and is worn on the head under protective hear such as helmets. The sensor itself is actually an array of flexible force sensors that are connected to a micro controller that illuminates three indicator LEDs. One LED is a battery indicator, one flashes yellow if the impact was mild, and the third flashes red for severe blows.

Verizon, Intel and Ridell all have similar systems in the R&D phase, but CheckLight is the first to hit the market. What sets it apart from the rest is that coaches, training staff and even other players can get somewhat of an indication whether or not a player has suffered a serious hit and needs to be taken out of the game.

Reebok and MC10 hope to not only sell the device to professional and college athletic programs, but make the device available to k-12 schools and public sport programs. There is no word yet on pricing or availability, but we hope to see some numbers soon.

NEWS SOURCE:engadget.com

A web developer by day, Charles comes to TweakTown after a short break from the Tech Journalism world. Formerly the Editor in Chief at TheBestCaseScenario, he now writes Maker and DIY content. Charles is a self proclaimed Maker of Things and is a major supporter of the Maker movement. In his free time, Charles likes to build just about anything, with past projects ranging from custom PC cooling control systems to 3D printers. Other expensive addictions include Photography, Astronomy and Home Automation.

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