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NVIDIA 3D Vision now works with YouTube 3D videos, Firefox FTW

Google, Mozilla and NVIDIA team up, 3D videos on YouTube with NVIDIA 3D Vision

By Anthony Garreffa on May 27, 2011 01:26 am CDT - 0 mins, 52 secs reading time

Stereoscopic 3D is slowly making it's way everywhere, the limits of this are not known as now it has made its way to your browser and more specifically, YouTube. NVIDIA, Mozilla and Google have all combined their powers (minus Captain Planet) and have made stereoscopic 3D videos on YouTube to work with systems that are NVIDIA 3D Vision-powered. The feature is supported through a new HTML5-based 3D playback mode that works in Firefox 4.

nvidia_3d_vision_now_works_with_youtube_3d_videos_firefox_ftw_110

Mozilla products VP Jay Sullivan said in a statement:

Firefox with 3D Vision creates a stunning and smooth 3D video experience using HTML5 video based on open standards. 3D Vision from NVIDIA is a great example of the rich, innovative experiences that are being built on top of the speed and graphics power that Firefox delivers to the Web.

Sure, right now the audience is small, but every little bit counts, right? What gets me, is Google are partnered in this (because of YouTube), which is surprising as they left out their own growing browser, Chrome.

Anthony Garreffa

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Anthony Garreffa

Anthony is a long time PC enthusiast with a passion of hate for games to be built around consoles. With FPS gaming since the pre-Quake days, where you were insulted if you used a mouse to aim, he has been addicted to gaming and hardware ever since. Working in IT retail for 10 years gave him great experience with high-end, custom-built PCs. His addiction to GPU technology is unwavering, and with next-gen NVIDIA GPUs about to launch alongside 4K 144Hz HDR G-Sync gaming monitors and BFGDs (65-inch 4K 120Hz HDR G-Sync TVs) there has never been a time to be more excited about technology.

NEWS SOURCE:arstechnica.com

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