Hardcore Reactor PC uses liquid submersion

Steve Dougherty | | Oct 27, 2008 8:36 PM CDT

A relatively small fish in the computer industry, Hardcore Computers has just lived up to its name in a big way, making its presence known all over the web.

Hardcore Reactor PC uses liquid submersion

The company has just unveiled its latest creation, and what a hardcore piece of hardware it is. The Reactor is the first commercially available PC whereby the components are fully submerged under a custom dielectric liquid they call Core Coolant.

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Close encounter with MSI X58 Eclipse

Steve Dougherty | | Oct 27, 2008 7:41 PM CDT

With the launch of Intel X58 / Core i7 closing in fast, motherboard makers are allowing better looks at their (now final revision) boards on offer for the enthusiast desktop crowd.

Anandtech has acquired a bunch of high quality shots of MSIs upcoming X58 Eclipse offering in its full kitted final build status. The company has done away with its exclusive circu-pipe heatsink design this time around, in favour of a more traditional yet convincingly effective looking design.

Close encounter with MSI X58 Eclipse

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SLI on X58 Express without NF200 chip - for $5 USD

Cameron Wilmot | Video Cards & GPUs | Oct 24, 2008 1:17 AM CDT

Over the past few months, there has been plenty of speculation on whether or not SLI would be supported on Intel X58 Express motherboards.

At first it was believed that motherboard makers would need to add one or two nForce 200 chips to their boards, but that was not a good solution - too expensive, too hot and a PCB space-eater.

SLI on X58 Express without NF200 chip - for $5 USD

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Did AMD mess up shaders on Radeon HD 4830 samples?

Cameron Wilmot | Video Cards & GPUs | Oct 24, 2008 12:46 AM CDT

AMD may have made a fairly major mistake this week with the launch of its Radeon HD 4830 graphics card.

W1zzard over at techPowerUp! reckons that AMD may have sent out bad HD 4830 reference review samples to members of the press. The issue was discovered when shader counting support for the new HD 4830 was added to GPU-Z and partner cards showed a count of 640 stream processors (or shaders) and the reference sample from AMD which was sent to techPowerUp! and another site only had 560 shaders.

Did AMD mess up shaders on Radeon HD 4830 samples?

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LaCie releases LaCinema Rugged HDDs w/ HDMI

Elitest storage provider LaCie has just introduced a new series of portable hard drives which primarily cater to multimedia users.

LaCie releases LaCinema Rugged HDDs w/ HDMI

Dubbed the LaCinema Rugged family, these drives feature a scratch resistant aluminum shell which is further protected by shock-resistant rubber and internal anti-shock absorbing. The units run dimensions of 90 x 145 x 25 mm at a weight of 250 grams and can be purchased in capacities of 250, 320 and 500GB.

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ASUS preps a Xonar for true audiophiles

Steve Dougherty | | Oct 22, 2008 12:15 AM CDT

ASUS will soon extend their Xonar family of sound cards with the Xonar Essence STX and Expreview have the early take on what this card offers.

Aimed at the real audiophile who wants the most accurate pure output for their music, the card is said to be the worlds first with a Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of 124dB with just 0.0003% distortion. Another unique feature of the card is the onboard headphone amplifier which is capable of driving headphones rated for up to 600ohms, with less than 100dB distortion.

ASUS preps a Xonar for true music audiophiles

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Intel demonstrates Moorestown MID at IDF

Steve Dougherty | | Oct 20, 2008 5:33 PM CDT

During his opening keynote at IDF in Taipei earlier today, Intels senior vice president and general manager of the company's Ultra Mobility Group has demonstrated the first working Moorestown platform.

Beginning by reflecting on the importance of the quickly developing MID (Mobile Internet Devices) market in todays web crazed world, he then brought everyone up to speed on how well Moorestown is coming along; comprising an ultraportable System on a Chip (SoC) codenamed 'Lincroft' which carries everything from the 45nm CPU core to the memory controller, integrated graphics and video encoding/decoding abilities.

Intel demonstrates Moorestown MID at IDF

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Core i7s memory options are plentiful

Steve Dougherty | RAM | Oct 20, 2008 5:31 PM CDT

During their rounds at IDF earlier today, Fudzilla has acertained that Core i7 will in fact have an unlocked memory multiplier. It wasn't that long ago that a very sour rumour had emerged regarding Nehalem's ability (or therelackof) to run high speed (1600MHz+) DDR3 independantly of the CPU clockrate and voltage; this due to what was believed to be a limitation of the combined memory controller.

Core i7s memory options are plentiful

This report clears a few things up and puts those fears to rest, also making mention of Nehalem's ability to run different memory configurations (including mismatched modules) without any hiccups.

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