Just two of Intel's new Skylake CPUs are unlocked for overclocking

Anthony Garreffa | CPU, APU & Chipsets | Aug 30, 2015 10:47 PM CDT

Intel is about to drop the rest of its Skylake processors into the market, after the release of the Core i7-6700K and Core i5-6600K just recently. There will be eight more processors released, but the rest of them will not be unlocked models for overclocking.

The chipmaker will be offering up 10 total SKUs, with two of them already in the wild. The remaining 8 processors will be made up of four 65W, and four 35W low TDP chips. All of these processors will slot into the new LGA 1151 motherboards using the Z170, H170 and B150 chipsets. The new Skylake-S processors are as follows:

The most noteworthy chips out of the Skylake-S lineup are definitely the Core i7-6700K and Core i5-6600K as they are the unlocked, overclocking ready CPUs. But, the Core i7-6700 will feature a 3.4GHz frequency with 4GHz boost making it a viable alternative to the 6700K if you don't want to overclock. The 'low TDP' chips in the form of the Core i7-6700T, and the three other Core i5 processors with the 'T' moniker will be decent processors for low-power devices.

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Minecraft creator has 'never felt more isolated' with his $2.5 billion

Anthony Garreffa | Business, Financial & Legal | Aug 30, 2015 9:33 PM CDT

What would you do with $2.5 billion? I know I would do countless things like buy all of my friends and family houses and put enough money in their accounts that they would never have to worry about money ever again. But what about the man who sold Mojang? The company behind Minecraft. Well, he's super lonely according to his recent tweets.

Minecraft creator has 'never felt more isolated' with his $2.5 billion

Markus "Notch" Persson sold Mojang to Microsoft nearly a year ago now for $2.5 billion, purchased a $70 million mansion, and has been hosting insane parties ever since. Recently, Persson tweeted: "The problem with getting everything is you run out of reasons to keep trying, and human interaction becomes impossible due to imbalance. Hanging out in ibiza with a bunch of friends and partying with famous people, able to do whatever I want, and I've never felt more isolated".

The tweets from Persson can be found below.

Continue reading: Minecraft creator has 'never felt more isolated' with his $2.5 billion (full post)

Julian Assange urged Edward Snowden to pick Russia over Latin America

Michael Hatamoto | Hacking, Security & Privacy | Aug 30, 2015 8:04 PM CDT

Julian Assange knows a little something about trying to avoid extradition, and urged former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to select Russia over Latin America. Not only was reaching Latin America a difficult journey, but Snowden's personal safety would have been at risk, Assange noted.

Assange urged Snowden to disregard "negative PR consequences" about choosing Russia, where his physical safety has been provided by the Russian government - a guarantee that would have been significantly less likely if he ended up somewhere in Central or South America.

Sarah Harrison, one of Assange's most trusted senior staff members, actually met with Snowden while the American was in Hong Kong - at a time when it was unknown where Snowden would end up.

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Cyclist has a rather amusing encounter with a Google self-driving car

Michael Hatamoto | Electric Vehicles & Cars | Aug 30, 2015 7:33 PM CDT

It looks like Google's autonomous vehicle is still learning every time it hits the open road, and a cyclist at a stop sign helped give it another learning opportunity. The cyclist was doing a track stand at the stop sign, and since the car arrived first, the autonomous vehicle had the right of way - but the vehicle just wasn't sure how to proceed with the cyclist present.

When the cyclist moved forward, the car inched forward and would stop so the cyclist would be able to go. The car noticed the cyclist's presence, but may have been overly cautious - which is something autonomous vehicles are designed for - so this will have to be considered just one more learning experience for Google developers. The cyclist's trackstand, since he wasn't actively moving forward or completely stopped, threw off the autonomous vehicle.

As an avid cyclist, hearing Oxtox's encounter is a rather perplexing one that Google will certainly try to sort out. There are an alarming number of incidents between vehicles and people on bikes, and the forum post noted: "The odd thing is that even tho (sic) it was a bit of a CF, I felt safer dealing with a self-driving car than a human-operated one."

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Corsair announces new Bulldog that will ship in time for Christmas

Michael Hatamoto | Computer Systems | Aug 30, 2015 6:01 PM CDT

Corsair announced the production version of its Bulldog DIY 4K gaming PC, with the first prototype shown off during Computex. The barebones system is designed to be a full PC that can be used in the living room, and leaves plenty of options for consumers to build a system as they see fit.

Corsair announces new Bulldog that will ship in time for Christmas

The Bulldog chassis is a "highly ventilated, stylish, compact console design" able to keep PC components cool, along with a 600-watt SFX power supply, and Hydro Series H5SF small form factor liquid CPU cooler. It's powered by a motherboard capable of supporting the Intel Z170 chipset, with a PCI Express 3.0 16x slot, two memory slots able to support 32GB of DD4 RAM, USB 3.0 and SATA ports, and Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and 7.1 channel audio.

Consumers must add their own Intel CUP, RAM, GPU, and storage - and can either run Microsoft Windows or SteamOS - to finalize the unit.

Continue reading: Corsair announces new Bulldog that will ship in time for Christmas (full post)

FBI demanded Scandinavian countries extradite Snowden if he visited

Michael Hatamoto | Hacking, Security & Privacy | Aug 30, 2015 5:36 PM CDT

Before former NSA contractor Edward Snowden fled to Russia, the FBI demanded the immediate arrest - and extradition - of Snowden if he went to any Scandinavian nations. Snowden applied for asylum in Norway, but once FBI officials heard he would try to head to a Scandinavian country, they began pressuring Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland. Trying to leave Moscow, however, wouldn't be an easy task:

"The US Department of Justice is prepared to immediately draft the necessary paperwork to request the extradition of Snowden to the US from whichever country he travels to from Moscow," according to the letter. "The FBI expresses its gratitude... for any assistance that can be provided on this important matter."

It's likely the FBI and other government officials sent similar requests to many other European nations, which prevented Snowden from traveling outside of Russia.

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NASA begins year-long Mars isolation experiment on Earth

The NASA-funded Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) experiment has started on Earth, designed to simulate a Mars mission.

The six participants, three men and three women, are scientists - and will be in tight quarters, living inside a 36-foot-wide dome that is 20-feet high. The project began on Friday and will last 365 days. Researchers will collect information regarding cognitive, social and emotional factors between each participant - and how they interact with one another.

NASA believes a mission to Mars could take more than three years to complete, so this is an important step to gather data.

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Ashley Madison CEO stepping down after devastating data breach

Michael Hatamoto | Hacking, Security & Privacy | Aug 30, 2015 6:35 AM CDT

Avid Life Media announced that CEO Noel Biderman has stepped down, following the company's embarrassing public data breach.

Senior management will be responsible for day-to-day operations of the company, until a permanent replacement can be identified. It's going to be a confusing time for Avid Life Media, after a "criminal intrusion" that reportedly occurred over years by unknown hackers.

"This change is in the best interest of the company and allows us to continue to provide support to our members and dedicated employees," Ashley Madison noted in a statement. "We are steadfast in our commitment to our customer base."

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Final Fantasy 15 almost had VR support

Final Fantasy 15 has seen lots of transitions during its storied development, including an experimental phase centered around immersive VR experiences.

Instead of forcing gamers to strap on an Oculus Rift for hours on end, Square Enix toyed with the idea of using VR for certain sections of the game in order to immerse players into the overall experience. "We had tested out utilizing VR," Square Enix's Hajime Tabata told IGN at PAX 2015. "At the time we were looking into it, we felt that it could potentially work as a passive experience for a portion of the game utilizing VR."

In the end, the devs decided that VR just wasn't a good fit for their action-based RPG--especially with that finicky targeting camera which would induce dizzying motion sickness."We felt that it would potentially make sense for a segment, but in terms of the overall game in itself, the entire game, we didn't feel that having that headset on for the entirety of the game and that experience would match what we were aiming for with XV. It's a very long game [and] you'd wear that headset for hours."

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VR will slowly trickle to mainstream market, says Oculus founder

With its near-limitless potential, virtual reality remains one of the most exciting new tech innovations in recent memory--but Oculus Rift creator Palmer Luckey concedes that the transition to VR will be a very slow-going process.

Accessibility remains one of VR's principal hurdles, as higher-end hardware is required to generate the illusion of total immersion. Headsets like the Oculus Rift pretty much act like advanced peripherals with the computer shouldering the brunt of the workload, and most everyday consumers just aren't ready to shell out for a beefier rig--ontop of the HMD's cost.

"I mean the question is: how fast can virtual reality really take off? Right now, it requires a fairly significant investment in computing hardware, a pretty high-end PC," Oculus founder Palmer Luckey said in an interview with TrustedReviews. "Virtual reality is going to take a long time to become something that's truly mainstream."

Continue reading: VR will slowly trickle to mainstream market, says Oculus founder (full post)