ASUS teases AMD Radeon R9 Nano in white, with a custom PCB

Anthony Garreffa | Video Cards & GPUs | Oct 26, 2015 3:56 AM CDT

When AMD released the Radeon R9 Nano, we fell in love with not only its performance (for being such a tiny, tiny card) but its ultra awesome aesthetics. Well, it looks like we can expect ASUS to release a new R9 Nano, but the shroud on the cooler will be white.

According to ComputerBase.de, ASUS has used its own custom PCB (which isn't white) while dipping the shroud in white paint. The fan is still black, but you can't deny that it doesn't look slick. I would've expected something different from ASUS, maybe doing a black and red theme (in line with AMD's reference card) and in line with their Republic of Gamers brand.

But, you can't deny this R9 Nano doesn't look cool. Now I want to build a new black and white themed system with this new R9 Nano from ASUS.

Continue reading: ASUS teases AMD Radeon R9 Nano in white, with a custom PCB (full post)

NVIDIA ships mysterious 'JM601' GPU - is this a dual GPU, or Pascal?

Anthony Garreffa | Video Cards & GPUs | Oct 25, 2015 7:27 PM CDT

It looks like NVIDIA is testing out a new GPU, with a new 'JM601 graphics processor' spotted on Zauba. The most mysterious part of this is that it's called 'JM601', which is completely out of place, and totally unexpected.

So what do we think the new JM601 GPU is? Well, for one it could be a dual GPU card based on NVIDIA's current Maxwell architecture - think GTX 990 (dual GTX 980s, or heaven forbid, dual GTX 980 Ti/Titan X GPUs). Alternatively, it could be there to throw us off - but the most exciting part is that it could be a huge Pascal GPU and the name used here - 'JM601' - is to throw us off.

The new JM601 GPU is sitting on Zauba where it was sent on October 14, priced at 73,917 INR - which converts to around $1136. This isn't a cheap chip, so we should expect a monster dual-GPU, or this is the first Pascal-based card, possibly with GDDR5X as we reported not too long ago.

Continue reading: NVIDIA ships mysterious 'JM601' GPU - is this a dual GPU, or Pascal? (full post)

AMD reportedly lost its CPU architect, Jim Keller, to Samsung

Anthony Garreffa | Business, Financial & Legal | Oct 25, 2015 4:25 AM CDT

Last month, Jim Keller left AMD as their CPU architect, with the last of his work being done on the Zen architecture. Keller had helped AMD with their K7 and K8 architectures, which were some of AMD's more golden times in the CPU market.

It's now being rumored that Keller has joined Samsung, where he'll begin work in the mobile processor division. Keller has previously worked on mobile processors, where he helped out on the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S with Apple's A4 and A5S processors, respectively. The news of Keller joining Samsung is big, as he will be working out of their R&D centers in Austin, Texas.

Keller should further develop Samsung's already great mobile offerings, especially since the South Korean giant is on the forefront of 14nm FinFET technology.

Continue reading: AMD reportedly lost its CPU architect, Jim Keller, to Samsung (full post)

Sony 'might consider' making high-performance PS4 model

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Oct 24, 2015 9:57 PM CDT

Despite being more powerful than Microsoft's Xbox One console, Sony's PlayStation 4 leaves much to be desired; its Jaguar APU is quite outdated and matches up to yesteryear PC builds in terms of performance. But it looks like Sony might consider refreshing the PlayStation 4 with new hardware to meet and go beyond the 1080p 60FPS standard.

Sony 'might consider' making high-performance PS4 model

In a recent interview with Japanese publication 4Gamer, Sony exec Masayasu Ito said that the PS4's x86 architecture opens up the possibilities for expanded hardware in the future. "The PS4's x86 architecture makes the console forward compatible, making it possible to incorporate performance enhancements required at any time," Ito said, answering the query on a possible enhanced PS4.5 console. "[As such], the possibility of a high-performance version of PS4 is an idea that can be considered."

It's been no secret that consoles have always lagged behind PC's in terms of hardware, and consoles traditionally ship with outdated hardware. With today's blistering-fast evolution of tech, that disparity has become pretty obvious, especially with mid-range PC's easily maintaining 1080p 60FPS, and let's not even get into 4K gaming which is becoming more mainstream with 4K displays dropping in price as each month passes. It'd be great to see the PS4 adopt dedicated GPU and CPU solutions to help significantly boost performance, but that would likely compromise the console's unified 8GB GDDR5 RAM system and call for a complete overhaul.

Continue reading: Sony 'might consider' making high-performance PS4 model (full post)

StarCraft eSports professional says that RTS is 'the dying genre'

Chris Smith | Gaming | Oct 24, 2015 6:34 PM CDT

Thinking back to when I started 'gaming' in 1994 and beyond, games like WarCraft II, Age of Empires and Red Alert series filled up my childhood gaming experiences, with Real Time Strategy (RTS) games being king of the times. Advancements saw awesome games like StarCraft: Brood War and WarCraft III blossom into flourishing eSports titles, played around the world by gamers who were vying for thousands of dollars in prize money.

StarCraft eSports professional says that RTS is 'the dying genre'

Skip ahead to 2015 - where is the RTS scene right now? As written by Evil Genius' Geoff 'iNcontroL' Robinson, it would seem that RTS is now a completely dying genre. With Robinson pointing out StarCraft as "the last stand," he makes mention that while we have Call of Duty titles being sequentially released yearly, when's the last time you saw consistent, competitive, RTS releases?

With WarCraft 4 quite possibly far away on the horizon, Robinson made mention that he believes "the RTS genre is just not what people get excited about these days," reasoning that "RTS games require patience, deep thought, speed, a bit of a gamble and so much more."

Continue reading: StarCraft eSports professional says that RTS is 'the dying genre' (full post)

Razer's OSVR headset pre-orders pegged at $300, start shipping Nov 23

Razer has now opened pre-orders for its OSVR Hacker Development Kit headsets, with the OSVR headset available for $300, and begins shipping on November 23.

The peripherals giant wanrs that the OSVR headset has a warning that "the OSVR Hacker Developer's Kit is for development purposes and will ship with a 30 day warranty". Consumers can dive in, but Razer has warned you. As for the OSVR itself, it features a 5.5-inch OLED screen with an awesome 120Hz refresh rate, offering a pixel density of 401PPI.

The Razer OSVR also has an IR camera operating at 100Hz, and 360-degree tracking, too. Razer CEO Min-Liang Tang added: "Gaming is moving towards the virtual reality platform and this poses huge benefits and challenges to gamers at every level. OSVR brings game developers, gamers and hardware manufacturers together to solve those challenges and make virtual reality gaming a reality for the masses".

Continue reading: Razer's OSVR headset pre-orders pegged at $300, start shipping Nov 23 (full post)

The Division's lighting and weather effects showcased in latest video

Anthony Garreffa | Gaming | Oct 24, 2015 3:23 AM CDT

If there's one game that's on my radar, but I'm ready to be disappointed with, it would have to be The Division. The latest video released on YouTube showcases the incredible lighting and weather effects in the game, so check it out below.

The Division's lighting and weather effects showcased in latest video

As you can see, The Division is running on a Xbox One, and it still looks great. After a tumultuous time of purported graphics downgrades, it's nice to see that it still looks great. We've heard that there could be a post-release graphics upgrade, so we don't know what to expect when it arrives. We do know that The Division will be capped at 30FPS on both the Xbox One and PS4.

Continue reading: The Division's lighting and weather effects showcased in latest video (full post)

Nintendo teases surprises and twists for Zelda Wii U

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Oct 23, 2015 6:40 PM CDT

While Nintendo disappointed Wii U owners across the globe by delaying the new Zelda Wii U game to 2016, the games maker plans to use that extra time to pepper some hidden surprises that will make the open-world Zelda adventure much more memorable.

Nintendo teases surprises and twists for Zelda Wii U

In a recent interview with IGN, Legend of Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma revealed that he will adapt his own interpretation of fan's feedback and inject it right into Zelda Wii U's huge open world.

"We actually had some feedback from Skyward Sword, where people were saying, 'This is not exactly the Zelda game I was looking for, I was looking for a bigger open world.' Unfortunately, I can't go into details but I'm hoping to put a surprise, or kind of a twist, on my view of an open world game. I hope that you'll look forward to it."

Continue reading: Nintendo teases surprises and twists for Zelda Wii U (full post)

VR requires experience with 'high-end PC development', says dev

While virtual reality tech requires high-performance hardware to simulate the low-latency mirage-like magic of a virtual space, the other half of the VR puzzle lies in a developer's experience. Devs need to have in-depth knowledge and be familiar not only with professional-grade GPU's and hardware, but also be able to push the tech past its known boundaries--but the VR space is chocked full of inexperienced devs.

VR requires experience with 'high-end PC development', says dev

Everyone wants to get in on VR. As the new gaming platform of the future, VR represents a leap forward in innovation and possibility, attracting a staggering amount of developers across the world. But not all of these developers are actually qualified to create games on the platform, leading to amateur experiences rather than the dazzling and immersion games that fully harness VR's potential.

"What we often find is less experienced teams that we're seeing demos from, they don't have enough experience with graphics optimisation," said Thor Gunnarsson, developer at Solfar Studios, an interview with Games Industry Biz. "Things like shader development, lighting, and so on. Consequently, they often end up with these quite basic, solid-shaded or cartoony style experiences. We think that's a bit of a challenge. You ideally want to have teams that have some background from console or high-end PC development to actually create the richness of the environment."

Continue reading: VR requires experience with 'high-end PC development', says dev (full post)

Fallout 4 has officially gone gold and is ready to ship

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Oct 23, 2015 3:12 PM CDT

Bethesda Softworks today announced that one of this year's most monumentally anticipated games, Fallout 4, has officially gone gold and is completely finalized.

Fallout 4 is now totally finished and ready to be shipped into the hands of millions of eager, awaiting fans. In less than three weeks time you'll be able to jump into post-apocalyptic Boston for some first-person havoc, tackling a number of quests and leveling up your survivor with a slew of new dynamic perks and customizations.

If you're a PC owner, be sure to check out Fallout 4's official specs to make sure your rig is compatible, but in all honesty it should be considering Bethesda's new Fallout really isn't graphically or performance intensive.

Continue reading: Fallout 4 has officially gone gold and is ready to ship (full post)