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Skylake-X Overclocking Guide (Page 1)

Skylake-X Overclocking Guide

Here is everything you need to know to overclock Skylake-X.

Steven Bassiri | Feb 26, 2018 at 6:00 pm CST - 1 min, 35 secs time to read this page

Overclocking Skylake-X

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Intel's Skylake microarchitecture has come a long way since it was introduced. The basic microarchitecture is used in Kaby Lake CPUs, Kaby Lake-X CPUs, Coffee Lake CPUs, and with slight modifications in Skylake-X CPUs. At the time of Skylake launch, Intel called the microarchitecture its "best ever". Its domination, even in recent times, reflects the strength of the microarchitecture. However, with the launch of Skylake-X, Intel made some actual modifications to improve upon the original architecture.

Intel boosted core count a lot, and because of the new higher core count CPUs Intel moved towards a mesh architecture and abandoned their ring architecture for the new CPUs. The change was made so that cores could communicate with each other without having to go all around the ring bus. The new mesh doesn't affect overclocking too much but will come into consideration later in the guide. The new CPU also features new AVX hardware and supports AVX-512, which will also come up later in the guide.

The Flow Chart

Skylake-X Overclocking Guide 02 | TweakTown.com

The flow chart above is just a suggestion on the order of operations for you to get a taste of how we will overclock the CPU. However, before we go further, we must mention that there are two types of consumer Skylake-X CPUs. You have Low Core Count (LCC) CPUs with up to 10 cores (7900X is max), and then you have High Core Count (HCC) CPUs with up to 18 cores (7980XE is max).

The HCC CPUs are extremely voltage sensitive when it comes to temperatures, but the LCC CPUs can take a few more millivolts and still stay under 80C. You want to shoot for overclocking your CPU first, then move to the mesh, and then memory. You don't need to overclock the mesh, but it's not super taxing to do so and can give you a performance boost.

Last updated: Sep 25, 2019 at 12:24 am CDT

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Steven Bassiri

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Steven Bassiri

Steven went from a fledgling forum reader in 2003 to one of the internet's brightest tech stars by 2010. Armed with an information systems degree, a deep understanding of circuitry, and a passion for tech, Steven (handle Sin0822) enjoys sharing his deep knowledge with others. Steven details products down to the component level to highlight seldom explained, and often misunderstood architectures. Steven is also a highly decorated overclocker with several world records.

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