Technology and gaming content trusted in North America and globally since 1999
8,614 Reviews & Articles | 60,984 News Posts

ASUS is ready for SATA Express - Early tech and performance preview (Page 1)

ASUS is ready for SATA Express - Early tech and performance preview

With SATA III limiting performance nowadays, SATA-I/O went to work designing the storage technology for the future, and now we have it to try out.

Chris Ramseyer | Dec 20, 2013 at 4:10 pm CST - 1 min, 33 secs time to read this page

Introduction

ASUS is ready for SATA Express - Early tech and performance preview 03 | TweakTown.com

In May 2011, SandForce released the first SSD bottlenecked by the SATA III bus. It was just five months after Intel released the P67 Express chipset, Intel's first native SATA III capable release. Until then, PATA and SATA lived long, fulfilling lives, always ahead of the performance curve offered by new data storage products. This fact is just one reason why we call flash-based storage a disruptive technology.

ASUS is ready for SATA Express - Early tech and performance preview 02 | TweakTown.com

Photo for demonstration purposes only

The standards body, SATA-I/O, quickly jumped into action. The logical choice was to double performance again, going from 6Gbps to 12Gbps. What the group found was that the interface would need signification changes, shielding, and additional development time. This led to additional development time, but in 2013, SATA-I/O published the SATA 3.2 specifications, this time with a viable solution for quick implementation and a way to reduce cost. SATA-I/O went PCI Express.

The move to PCI Express provides an instant performance increase from 6Gbps to 8Gbps via two PCI Express 2.0 lanes. SATA Express standardizes a 2.5" form factor to move the drives away from your motherboard and in the way of multi-GPU configurations.

Moving forward from what we're showing today, SATA Express has several upgrade paths. The first is a shift to PCIE 3.0 where advanced 128b/130b encoding increases efficiency from 80% to 98.5%. Both SATA and PCIe 2.0 use 8b/10b encoding, so 20% of the available bandwidth if used for overhead. PCIe 3.0 reduces the overhead to just 1.5%.

The other option we'll see from controller makers is increasing the number of lanes to the SSD controller, but that won't be possible over SATA Express since it's limited to just two lanes. Over PCIe 2.0 that means 1000 MB/s or 800 MB/s after overhead.

ASUS sent us an early motherboard prototype sample that supports SATA Express. So, let's check it out and see some early performance numbers.

Last updated: Apr 7, 2020 at 12:32 pm CDT

PRICING: You can find products similar to this one for sale below.

USUnited States: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.com

UKUnited Kingdom: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.co.uk

AUAustralia: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.com.au

CACanada: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.ca

DEDeutschland: Finde andere Technik- und Computerprodukte wie dieses auf Amazon.de

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Chris Ramseyer

Chris Ramseyer started his career as a LAN Party organizer in Midwest USA. After working with several computer companies he was asked to join the team at The Adrenaline Vault by fellow Midwest LAN Party legend Sean Aikins. After a series of shake ups at AVault, Chris eventually took over as Editor-in-Chief before leaving to start Real World Entertainment. Look for Chris to bring his unique methods of testing Hard Disk Drives, Solid State Drives as well as RAID controller and NAS boxes to TweakTown as he looks to provide an accurate test bed to make your purchasing decisions easier.

We openly invite the companies who provide us with review samples / who are mentioned or discussed to express their opinion. If any company representative wishes to respond, we will publish the response here. Please contact us if you wish to respond.

Related Tags