DFI LANPARTY B Canterwood and Springdale - Head to Head

We've got two very capable Pentium 4 based chipsets under the spotlight today from Intel based on DFI's new line of LANPARTY "B" motherboards for the enthusiast. We compare the more expensive Canterwood to the cut-down Springdale chipset but tweaked up by DFI. The results may surprise!
| Dec 2, 2003 at 11:00 pm CST
Manufacturer: none

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Introduction

IntroductionUp until recently, DFI weren't all that popular within the motherboard scene, particularly when focusing on products for the enthusiast. A little over eight months ago they decided to go bolder, bigger, and better by introducing their new "LANPARTY" series of motherboards. This has certainly brought a lot of attention to DFI from enthusiasts alike all over the world. Unlike most other companies in the past, rather than make the slow transition from a no-frills, average line of products into something that stands out from the crowd, DFI have suddenly gone out on a limb and given us a line of products that is almost enough to make one's jaw drop.Today we have rounded up two of the latest "LANPARTY" series of boards by DFI. They are both Intel Pentium 4 solutions, being the Canterwood 875P and Springdale 865PE. DFI have only continued to make a good thing better with the latest revision of their Pro 875B, as well as the much-welcomed 865PE we are also checking out today.When Springdale based motherboards first hit the scene (primarily to provide a more cost effective solution for the mainstream sector of the market), it was common knowledge that the Canterwood chipset was the king of performance, and rightfully so due to the significantly larger price tag that came with it. However, Springdale based motherboards have become more and more refined as time has gone by, particularly over the past 6 months. Just HOW much faster are they though? In eliminating any manufacturing differences due to both boards coming straight from DFI, we're about to find out.Let's hop to it!

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Specifications

Specifications of DFI LANPARTY 865PECPUIntel Pentium 4 Processor with Hyper-Threading Technology - 800MHz/533MHz system data busIntel Pentium 4 Northwood processor - 533MHz/400MHz system data busIntel Celeron Northwood processor - 400MHz system data busChipsetIntel 865PE chipset - Intel 865PE Memory Controller Hub (MCH) - Intel 82801EB I/O Controller Hub (ICH5)System MemoryFour 184-pin DDR DIMM sockets Supports dual channel (128-bit wide) memory interfaceSupports up to 4GB system memorySynchronous operation with processor system bus - PC2100/PC2700/PC3200 (DDR266/DDR333/DDR400) with 800MHz FSB CPU. DDR333 will run at 320MHz memory frequency when used with 800MHz FSB CPU. - PC2100/PC2700 (DDR266/DDR333) with 533MHz FSB CPU - PC2100 (DDR266) with 400MHz FSB CPUSupports non-ECC (x64) DIMM using 128Mb, 256Mb or 512MbSupports unbuffered DIMMsBIOSAward BIOS, Windows 98SE/2000/ME/XP Plug and Play compatibleGenie BIOS provides: - CPU/DRAM overclocking - AGP/PCI/SATA overclocking - CPU/DIMM/AGP overvoltageFlash EPROM for easy BIOS upgrades 4Mbit flash memoryCMOS ReloadedSuper PatchAudioC-Media CMI9739a 6-channel codec20-bit stereo full-duplex codec with independent variable sampling rateHigh quality differential CD inputTrue stereo line level outputsS/PDIF-in/out interfaceLANRealtek RTL8110S Gigabit LAN PCI controllerFull duplex support at both 10, 100 and 1000 MbpsSATA IDE WITH RAIDSilicon Image Sil3112A PCI to Serial ATA controllerSupports two SATA (Serial ATA) interfaces which are compliant with SATA 1.0 specification (1.5Gbps interface)Supports RAID 0 and RAID 1IEEE 1394 (Firewire)VIA VT6306 PCI 1394 integrated host controllerSupports three 100/200/400 Mb/sec portsAGPSupports 1.5V AGP 8x (2.13GB/sec.) and AGP 4x(1066MB/sec.) for 3D graphics applications (AGP 2x and 3.3V AGP card are not supported)Supports AGP 3.0 and AGP 2.0 spec.Rear Panel I/O Ports1 PS/2 mouse port1 PS/2 keyboard port1 DB-9 serial port1 DB-25 parallel port4 USB 2.0/1.1 ports1 1394 port1 RJ45 LAN port2 S/PDIF RCA jacks (S/PDIF-in and S/PDIF-out)3 audio jacks: line-out, line-in and mic-in 2 audio jacks for center/bass and rear outI/O Connectors2 connectors for 4 additional external USB 2.0/1.1 ports2 connectors for 2 external IEEE 1394 ports1 front audio connector for external line-out and mic-in jacks1 connector for an external game/MIDI port2 internal audio connectors (CD-in and AUX-in)1 S/PDIF connector for optical cable connection1 connector for IrDA interface4 Serial ATA connectors2 IDE connectors1 floppy connector2 ATX power connectors (20-pin and 4-pin 12V)1 Wake-On-LAN connector1 opened chassis alarm connectorCPU fan, chassis fan and 2nd fan connectors4 diagnostic LEDs1 diagnostic LED connector for external 4 diagnostic LEDs displayEZ touch switches (power switch and reset switch)Expansion Slots1 AGP slot5 PCI slotsSpecifications of DFI LANPARTY Pro 875BCPUIntel Pentium 4 Processor with Hyper-Threading Technology - 800MHz/533MHz system data busIntel Pentium 4 Northwood processor - 533MHz/400MHz system data busIntel Celeron Northwood processor - 400MHz system data busChipsetIntel 875P chipset - Intel 82875P Memory Controller Hub (MCH) - Intel 82801ER I/O Controller Hub (ICH5R)System MemorySupports dual channel (128-bit wide) memory interface - Each channel supports 2 DIMM socketsSupports up to 4GB system memorySupports Dynamic mode to optimize system performanceSynchronous operation with processor system bus - PC2100/PC2700/PC3200 (DDR266/DDR333/DDR400) with 800MHz FSB CPU (supports PAT mode). DDR333 will run at 320MHz memory frequency when used with 800MHz FSB CPU. - PC2100/PC2700 (DDR266/DDR333) with 533MHz FSB CPU - PC2100 (DDR266) with 400MHz FSB CPUSupports ECC/non-ECC DIMMsSupports unbuffered DIMMsBIOSAward BIOS, Windows 98SE/2000/ME/XP Plug and Play compatibleGenie BIOS provides: - CPU/DRAM overclocking in 1MHz stepping - AGP/PCI/SATA overclocking - CPU/DIMM/AGP overvoltage4Mbit flash memoryCMOS ReloadedAudio20-bit stereo full-duplex codec with independent variable sampling rateHigh quality differential CD inputTrue stereo line level outputsS/PDIF-in/out interface6-channel audio outputLANUses 82547EI Gigabit LAN CSA interfaceFull duplex support at both 10, 100 and 1000 MbpsATA RAIDUses HighPoint 372N RAID controllerRAID 0, 1, 0+1 and 1.5ICH5R SATA IDE WITH RAIDSupports two SATA (Serial ATA) interfaces which are compliant with SATA 1.0 specification (1.5Gbps interface)Supports RAID 0 and RAID 1AGPSupports 1.5V AGP 8x (2.13GB/sec.) and AGP 4x (1066MB/sec.) for 3D graphics applications (AGP 2x and 3.3V AGP card are not supported)Supports AGP 3.0 and AGP 2.0 spec.Rear Panel I/O Ports4 USB 2.0/1.1 ports1 RJ45 LAN port1 DB-9 serial port1 DB-25 parallel port1 mini-DIN-6 PS/2 mouse port1 mini-DIN-6 PS/2 keyboard port2 RCA jacks for S/PDIF-in and S/PDIF-out2 audio jacks for center/bass and rear out3 audio jacks: line-out, line-in and mic-inI/O Connectors2 connectors for 4 additional external USB 2.0/1.1 ports1 front audio connector for external line-out and mic-in jacks1 connector for an external game/MIDI port2 internal audio connectors (CD-in and AUX-in)1 S/PDIF-in/out connector for optical cable connection1 connector for IrDA interface2 RAID IDE connectors2 Serial ATA connectors2 IDE connectors1 floppy connector2 ATX power supply connectors1 Wake-On-LAN connector4 fan connectors for CPU fan, chassis fan, second fan and chip fan1 diagnostic LED connector for external 4 diagnostic LEDs displayEZ touch switches (power switch and reset switch)Expansion Slots1 AGP slot 5 PCI slots

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Features - Packaging & Contents

Packaging & Contents
Both boards are packaged with the same accessories, in the same manner. Oh and what a package it is! The actual box is the largest one I've seen of any motherboard package to date. When you open the box you'll understand why. There are five separate boxes inside. They consist of a "PC Transpo", Rounded Cables, Front-X 5"1/4 unit, Accessory Kit, and of course another box containing the motherboard itself. Let's take a look at each of these boxes in more detail.- PC Transpo
This box contains a carry strap designed to wrap around your case, making for easier transport. It is designed to suit any standard midi tower case, and there are pockets on the sides to allow for transport of your mouse, keyboard, and various other cables too. This is something you certainly don't see in other motherboard packages around, but is a nice addition to the "LANPARTY" range as it is quite evident that the motherboard itself is aimed towards the LAN party community.- Rounded Cable Box
This box includes three orange "UV reactive" rounded cables - two being IDE and one floppy. The cables look to be very nice quality indeed, and are more than long enough for most people's needs. Even today, very few motherboard packages have the inclusion of rounded cables so this was another nice offering from DFI.- Front X
Here is clearly another device you wouldn't normally see included within a motherboard package. The Front X takes up a 5"1/4 drive bay and allows for easy access to USB ports (via the headers on the motherboard) as well as a headphones and line-out socket. The device also has the ability to be customized in terms of socket placement as well as leaving room for additional sockets you may like to implement down the track. A new feature of this device as part of the B revision boards (along with the 865PE) is the Diagnostic LED display of which is designed to be attached to the FrontX Panel. With the four LED's you can see the progress of your system as it cycles from POST to desktop. Should a problem arise, it will be a helpful tool in sourcing the problem at hand. The only gripe I have with this device is that I feel it's been introduced 2 years too late. You will find that almost all cases nowadays, be it on the cheap or not, have their own built-in USB and audio sockets. As for the Diagnostic LED display, that could just as easily be placed elsewhere. Keeping that aside, the panel would be a highly useful feature, particularly when using headphones and so forth at LANs.- Accessory Kit
Within this box we have a number of smaller bits and pieces including two red SATA cables, a SATA power converter cable, some el'cheapo thermal paste, a backplate for the motherboard, a PCI bracket with a gaming port for the onboard sound, and in the case of the 865PE board, another PCI bracket with a Firewire port.- Motherboard Box
Inside here is the heart of it all. Aside from the superb looking motherboard itself (we'll be getting to them shortly), we have the obvious inclusion of manuals galore, CD's and floppy disks containing a stack of supporting applications and drivers, a rather large (and cool looking) LANPARTY sticker, case badge, and some spare jumpers.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Features - A look at the Motherboards

Features - A look at the MotherboardsAt first glance you will see just how much effort DFI have gone to in giving you a couple of visually stunning and unique looking motherboards. Both of these motherboards follow a bright orange theme. When paired up with an ultra violet cold cathode these areas of the motherboard are all UV reactive, which produces a magnificent result inside a case that has a window. The PCB itself is smartly done in a dark brown color of which effectively helps to make the UV reactive areas stand out even more. A wonderful touch DFI!
Now, of course there are also many of you that couldn't care less about the aesthetics of a motherboard, seeing as a lot of people can't be bothered with a side window and all the tidying/prettying up involved with it. However motherboard layout, features, and performance is where it's at right? Right! On with the show then!- Motherboard LayoutLooking at both motherboards, there are only slight differences in the way both laid out with the main reason being down to minor variations in the features available between the two. We'll start with the Intel 865PE.
First impressions on the 865PE are very strong. Viewing the motherboard as though placed upright inside a case, the 20pin ATX connector is nicely sitting out of the way to the far top right hand side. You'll find the two PATA ports along with the floppy port here too, this is an idea I am particularly fond of because you don't have the problem of trying to stretch those cables up to the higher bays on your full tower case, plus it also eliminates any chunky cables running across the motherboard which would have adversely affected cooling and tidiness. The 12v Aux Connector is over to the left of the rather large passive heatsink of which is cooling the Northbridge. The motherboards four DIMM slots are smartly color coded to make it easier in firing up Dual Channel mode operation. Down at the bottom left corner you'll find two SATA RAID ports controlled by the Silicon Image 3112A controller, and another two just above them of which are natively controlled by the ICH5R Southbridge from Intel. Just above the CMOS battery you'll notice two buttons - one being for POWER and the other for RESET. The "EZ ON/EZ TOUCH" (as DFI have called it) is a very convenient implementation by DFI as it saves the hassle of having to connect a case button to the motherboard in order to power it up. It's particularly handy for us testers too. In terms of fitting very long and beefy AGP cards, there's no hassles here as the motherboard uses a 1/5 AGP/PCI configuration which means there's more room for the AGP slot to go a notch lower and quite easily clear the bottom of the DIMM slots. All in all, this motherboard has evidently had plenty of thought put into it. Thumbs up here! Now we'll see if DFI have managed to carry this excellent layout through to its big brother, the Pro 875B.
This motherboards layout thankfully does not differ all that much to the 865PE. So of course, only the noteworthy differences will be mentioned. The 12v Aux connector has been placed in between the DIMM slots and the CPU cooling bracket. I prefer this placement as it's easier to keep the cable out of the way of the CPU's HSF. There is no Silicon Image SATA controller on this motherboard, so only two SATA ports are available via the ICH5R Southbridge. However, the implementation of Highpoint's 372N PATA RAID controller is resident on this motherboard. These two ports are located at the bottom right along with the floppy port. So to tie that in with the information on the 865PE, I am once again very pleased with the design.That wraps up the physical layout of these motherboards, now to take a closer look at the distinguished differences between each of them in terms of features.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Features - A look at the Motherboards (Cont.)

Features - A look at the Motherboards (Continued)For those of you only venturing into the motherboard scene as of recently, allow me to give you a brief description on the differences between the chipsets with both motherboards.- Chipset RundownThe 865PE and Pro 875B motherboards are both designed with the Intel platform in mind as mentioned already. The 865PE is based on the "Springdale" standard unlike the 875 chipset of which is "Canterwood", at the end of the day the differences are very subtle. Basically, the only real world features and abilities the 865PE chipset lacks over that of the somewhat more expensive 875P is CSA LAN, ECC memory support, and "PAT". Although CSA LAN eliminates any bottlenecks within the PCI bus, you only benefit from it most when fully utilizing an actual Gigabit Ethernet connection. I will still admit it's comforting to know it's there, though. Aside from that, all the usual features of today such as Hyper Threading / 8x AGP / Dual Channel / 800MHz FSB support are seen on both motherboards. The big plus with motherboards based on the 865PE chipset is that they are considerably cheaper, allowing for a more cost effective solution over the somewhat more expensive i875P Canterwood range.In reference to "PAT" (Performance Acceleration Technology) seen only on the 875P chipsets, shortly after the release of the i865PE chipset it was discovered that "PAT" could be enabled quite easily, and thus closed much of the performance gap between Springdale and Canterwood. Several motherboard manufacturers have gone about this by sneaking behind the Intel Engineer's backs with slight alterations to the name. For instance, Soltek call theirs "MBA" otherwise known as "Memory Boost Accelerator". DFI have of course done the same here with their 865PE, naming their variation to the functionality as "Super Patch". By default its disabled on this motherboard, however we decided to enable it during our overclocked bench tests of which you will see shortly.DFI have also implemented yet another unique and highly useful feature to all of their latest LANPARTY "B" revision motherboards (as well as the 865PE), labeled as CMOS Reloaded, this enables the user to select/tweak, define, save, and rename the CMOS. Currently, CMOS Reloaded allows you to save two distinct CMOS configurations. This is a brilliant idea, particularly for the vast majority of overclockers and enthusiasts out there who do not wish to write their overclocking settings down on paper.Now that you've had a brief rundown on the differences across the chipsets themselves, let's focus on the remaining features between both motherboards.- Onboard AudioDFI have chosen to go with the C-Media CMI9739a 6-Channel codec for both motherboards. Although it is nothing spectacular when compared to the likes of an Audigy 2, it is still more than sufficient for the average user who isn't overly fussed on the clarity of their sound output. An SPDIF in & out interface is included on the rear I/O panel (in place of what would have been a serial port) allowing for connection via a digital receiver.- Additional Features (865PE)
-Silicon Image 3112a PCI to Serial ATA RAID controller provides two ports- Intel ICH5 Southbridge provides two Serial ATA ports- VIA VT6306 PCI 1394 integrated host controller provides three Firewire ports- Realtek RTL8110S Gigabit LAN interface provides full duplex at 10/100/1000MbpsAs you can see, this motherboard certainly isn't lacking in the features dept. I am still a big fan of motherboards including PATA RAID but at the end of the day, we all know it's a slowly (but surely) dying interface.- Additional Features (Pro875B)
- Intel ICH5R Serial ATA RAID controller provides two ports- Highpoint 372N RAID controller provides two Parallel ATA ports- CSA 82547EI Gigabit LAN Interface provides full duplex at 10/100/1000MbpsHmm, the obvious question here. Where's our Firewire, DFI? Apart from that, this motherboard has everything you need.All in all, DFI have provided us with the usual assortment of features enthusiasts would expect to see on motherboards of today. Tied in with the all the goodies the box itself provides, DFI have given us an array of features galore.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Overclocking

Overclocking AbilitiesAll of DFI's LANPARTY motherboards have a menu within the Award BIOS named "Genie BIOS". This is where all the common overclocking features can be found. Both of these motherboards are identical in terms of the overclocking options available to you.They allow for CPU/DRAM overclocking in 1MHz increments ranging from 100MHz through to 400MHz. The AGP/PCI/SATA clock can also be locked at various frequencies. In terms of voltage ranges, the CPU voltage can be adjusted from 1.55v through to 1.975v, although any voltage over 1.8v would require excellent cooling such as a peltier or water. The memory voltage ranges from 2.6v to 2.9v. It would have been nice to see a 3.2v limit but that's a bit high for most people's liking anyway. The AGP voltage can be adjusted from 1.5v to 1.8v, although this is fairly useless nowadays with the inclusion of AGP locking abilities.We used an Intel Pentium 4 800MHz FSB 2.4GHz CPU paired up with a very nice set of Mushkin PC4000 modules (operating in Dual Channel mode) to find out the ceiling of both motherboards. Unfortunately, the maximum stable FSB we were able to reach with the 865PE was quite a dismal 225MHz but we must take into account the room temperature of which was around 33c at the time (which would have no doubt hindered performance somewhat).Enabling the "Super Patch" PAT-like function resulted in even further decrease of stability such as random lockups and blue screens. However, we were able to keep it stable whilst enabled at an FSB of 220MHz. We have already ruled out other hardware coming into play with the limitation of our overclock, and are certain it's the motherboard at "fault". The only other thing that comes to mind is the motherboard doesn't like the Mushkin memory, although I would tend to doubt this is the case as the memory is rated for 250MHz. In addition to that, the timings were completely relaxed at 2.5-8-3-3 and to help things along we pushed 2.8v through the sticks.As for the overclocking potential of the Canterwood Pro875B, it was almost no better with a maximum stable rate of 225MHz. Once again though, the room temperature was pushing 33c at the time so it certainly wouldn't have helped us here. All components used for these tests are proven to operate at much higher FSB's on other platforms; I sadly feel the motherboards themselves are just not capable of producing the kind of results a lot of overclockers would be hoping for.Although the results of our overclocks were considerably poor on both motherboards, we've still decided to use them in a few of our benchmarking tests of which you will see shortly. This is just so you can get an idea of the performance increase one can still expect within a slightly overclocked environment.Finally it's time to see just how well Springdale is performing these days in comparison to the Canterwood chipset, at least as far as DFI goes.On to the benchmarks we go!

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - Test System Setup and SiSoft Sandra 2004

Test System SetupProcessor: Intel Pentium 4 2.4GHz (800MHz FSB with HT enabled)Memory: 2x Mushkin 256MB PC4000 DDR-500 (Timings of 2.5-8-3-3 in Dual Channel mode) (Supplied by Mushkin)Hard Disk: Maxtor SATA 80GB 7,200 RPMGraphics Card: GeCube Radeon 9800 XT (Overdrive disabled) (Supplied by Kingmax Australia)Operating System: Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP1Drivers: ATI Catalyst 3.9 and Direct-X 9.0bFor all of our tests, apart from the overclocking tests, the PAT-like "Super Patch" feature of the Springdale motherboard was disabled. The exact same settings were made for both motherboard to make for an even playing field, such as disabling V-Sync and using the same memory timings.SiSoft Sandra 2004SiSoft Sandra (the System ANalyser, Diagnostic and Reporting Assistant) 2004 is a synthetic windows benchmark that features different tests used to evaluate different PC subsystems.
Initial results are somewhat surprising. As far as Sandra is concerned the variation in performance between the two chipsets is very minor, with the Springdale motherboard even slightly surpassing the Canterwood in a few of the tests. Also keep in mind; the "Super Patch" feature of the Springdale board was disabled at this stage. We only enabled it during our overclocked bench tests of which you will see shortly.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - PCMark2002

PCMark2002PCMark2002 is a multipurpose benchmark, suited for benchmarking all kinds of PCs, from laptops to workstations, as well as across multiple Windows operating systems. This easy-to-use benchmark makes professional strength benchmarking software available even to novice users. PCMark2002 consists of a series of tests that represent common tasks in home and office programs. PCMark2002 also covers many additional areas outside the scope of other MadOnion.com benchmarks.
Once again, we see very little difference between the two, with the Canterwood pulling just slightly ahead.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - 3DMark2001 SE

3DMark2001 SE3DMark2001 SE is a part of the popular 3DMark series. By combining DirectX 8.1 support with completely new graphics (including the GeForce4), it continues to provide benchmark results that empower you to make informed hardware assessments.
Looking at the above results, we once again find the Springdale right on the Canterwood's tail.Overclocking TestsAs mentioned earlier on, the maximum stable FSB we were able to achieve with each of the motherboards was a disappointing 220MHz (with Super Patch enabled) on the 865PE and 225MHz on the Pro 875B. As a result, the CPU clock rate was increased to 2640MHz and 2700MHz respectively.
It's interesting to see that even though the i875 has a 5MHz FSB (or 60MHz clock speed) advantage over the i865, the variation in performance is almost non-existent. Evidently "Super Patch" is playing a role here.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - 3DMark03

3DMark033DMark03 is the latest version of the highly favored 3DMark series. By combining full DirectX9.0 support with completely new tests and graphics, 3DMark03 continues the legacy of being industry standard benchmark.Please Note: Due to recent events with the 3DMark03 series, we are adding results purely for those who are still in favour of 3DMark03. These results should not be taken too seriously and are only added for interest sakes.
There is a strong pattern emerging here with the Springdale still showing no sign of failure to perform.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - AquaMark3

AquaMark3AquaMark3 is a powerful tool to determine reliable information about the gaming performance of a computer system. Because the benchmark extensively utilizes DirectX9, DirectX8 and DirectX7 functionality, it represents the requirements of typical gaming applications in 2003 and 2004.
Here we actually see the Springdale motherboard take charge! Although only by a small amount, it's not a result one would have expected.Overclocking Tests
Obviously AquaMark3 heavily relies on FSB speeds. Based on the stock results above, the extra 5MHz FSB is all that's needed to rightfully put the Canterwood back in front.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - Comanche 4, Jedi Knight II and UT2003

Comanche 4Comanche 4 is a helicopter simulation using the DirectX 8.1 graphics interface. It is used to test the memory and 3D subsystems of a motherboard and video processor. Any weaknesses will show up through this intensive benchmark.
Not much to comment on here, we still see the 865PE having no problems performing extremely well in comparison to the Canterwood Pro 875B.Our initial intention was to provide results at 640x480 as well as 1024x768, but we failed to see a valid reason for doing so as the results attained at lower resolutions were identical to what you see above.Jedi Knight IIJedi Knight II, Jedi Outcast is an OpenGL game that many have been waiting for. It has much-improved graphics over its predecessor. It fully supports advanced shaders, as well as very high texture resolutions and effects. There is one demo included in the multi-player section that is good for benchmarking use.
This is as close as it gets, "Canterwood and Springdale United". Both motherboards were also producing the same result at lower resolutions (34 FPS) so we felt no need to provide extra graphs.Unreal Tournament 2003Unreal Tournament 2003 continues the success that Unreal Tournament generated as an online game and benchmark. UT2003 pulls all of its weight on to the 3D and Memory subsystems, pushing graphics reality to the maximum is its game, and you need some serious power to gain playable scores with this game.
The Canterwood keeps control just slightly once again. The differences are barely noteworthy.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Benchmarks - Quake 3 Arena

Quake 3 ArenaQuake III Arena is a real-world OpenGL benchmark that we have been using here at TweakTown for quite a while now because it has proven itself to be one of the best gaming benchmarks around to compare a wide range of different products. Quake III is getting very old, but is still one of the best ways of testing video and PC systems for any instabilities and best performance.
The pattern continues here with the 865PE barely losing ground over the 875.Overclock Tests
Here we finally see the Canterwood pull right ahead. The extra 5MHz FSB would have no doubt helped it along although I'd say we're finally seeing a taste of roar Canterwood grunt as well.

DFI Canterwood and Springdale - Conclusion

ConclusionWell there we have it. Just as I suspected, Springdale has come a long way in recent months, although I must say I certainly wasn't expecting it to perform as closely to the 875 as it did. Also keep in mind that aside from the overclocked benchmark results, the Springdale motherboard's "Super Patch" feature was disabled throughout. At the end of the day, as far as these two motherboards go the difference in performance goes almost unnoticed. Big thumbs up to the 865PE for keeping up with its big brother, and in a few cases, taking the lead.As far as DFI goes, what they have given us is a full blown package with plenty of goodies to play with, none of which are out of place or useless (aside from the comment made on the Front-X earlier), particularly for enthusiasts which is where the LANPARTY range are aimed solely at. I myself have never come across such a wide range of features within a single motherboard package until now. The motherboards themselves would no doubt have the most appealing aesthetics I've come across to date. The UV reactive areas produce a sensational effect inside a windowed case, not to mention the UV reactive rounded cables of which top it all off. As far as stability goes, not once did either motherboard miss a beat. During both our stock and overclocked tests everything was set for smooth sailing.In terms of the cost involved in picking up one of the LANPARTY packages, you will be shelling out a few more bucks over the usual deal, but DFI made sure that you really do get what you pay for.The only downside to all of this with both motherboards? Overclocking potential! I'd like to blame the RAM or some other outside factor, but I really can't see this as being the case. Perhaps others will have better luck but unfortunately I have to base my opinion off the results of the tests here in our lab.Without ending this on a sour note, especially because I really REALLY like these motherboards, I have to once again point out just how impressed I was with the Springdale board in that it had no troubles performing right up to speed with the Canterwood. Up until now, any comparisons I've experienced between the two chipsets were easily distinguished. The fact that the 865PE is somewhat cheaper then the Pro 875B only highlights the obvious choice between the two as far as I'm concerned.865PE- ProsExcellent BundleAwesome board aesthetics & featuresPerformance right up there with Canterwood irrespective of "Super Patch"StableCMOS ReloadedEZ ON/EZ TOUCH Buttons- ConsPoor Overclocking ResultsNo CSA LANRating - 8.5 out of 10 and TweakTown's Best Performance Award
875B- ProsExcellent BundleAwesome board aestheticsMixture of PATA & SATA RAIDStableCMOS ReloadedEZ ON/EZ TOUCH Buttons- ConsPoor Overclocking ResultsNo FirewireRating - 8 out of 10

Last updated: Apr 7, 2020 at 12:26 pm CDT

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