Zyxel BE11000 NWA130BE Wi-Fi 7 NebulaFlex Access Point Review

Zyxel BE11000 NWA130BE Wi-Fi 7 NebulaFlex Access Point Review

Zyxel offers a legit low-cost offering into Wi-Fi 7 networking with the new Zyxel BE11000 NWA130BE Wi-Fi 7 NebulaFlex wireless access point.

Capcom says digital has helped reduce the high volatility of the games industry

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Jul 24, 2024 3:38 PM CDT

Capcom acknowledges that digital delivery has helped offset the high risk factors of the games industry through cost reduction and higher volume of readily-available game sales.

Capcom says digital has helped reduce the high volatility of the games industry

Consumers have mostly shifted towards digital game sales through a combination of convenience and insistence among publishers; games companies can pull specific levers through digital distribution, including frequent sales and discounts that aren't available through traditional retail channels.

This tactic has worked very well for most of gaming's biggest players, including Japanese publisher Capcom, who has achieved consecutive year-over-year operating profit growth for 10 years running. The company attributes these results in part to the digital landscape, which has helped Capcom lower the risk factors and general volatility that it used to face across international markets.

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Review bombing proves to be one of the most effective ways to instigate change

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Jul 24, 2024 2:28 PM CDT

While publishers ultimately call the shots with pricing schemes and delivery, consumers are able to effect change through one of the most powerful levers in the space: Review bombing.

Review bombing proves to be one of the most effective ways to instigate change

Review bombing campaigns have proven to be one of the most effective ways to send a message to publishers. Billion-dollar titans like Sony Interactive Entertainment, Electronic Arts, and even Take-Two Interactive are not immune to mass negative feedback on public storefronts; these negative reviews are a kind of scarlet letter that deter players while sending shockwaves among shareholders. Bad reviews--whether it be on aggregators like Metacritic or the aforementioned Steam--are a clear red flag to investors, and can spook stakeholders into selling their stocks.

Two recent examples of mass review bombing effecting change come to mind: The disastrous PR nightmare of Helldivers II, and the more recent backlash against Apex Legends. Both of these games have contributing significantly to their respective publishers, with Helldivers II's amazing 12 million sales helping boost SIE's earnings at a critical point, and Apex Legends' revenues helping consistently drive EA's multi-billion dollar live service empire.

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Don't want more ads in Windows 11? Well, more could be coming, but you may not care about these

Darren Allan | Software & Apps | Jul 24, 2024 2:00 PM CDT

Windows 11 might get more adverts soon (again), although they could appear in an area of the operating system that you're not too fussed about - or never even visit, perhaps.

Don't want more ads in Windows 11? Well, more could be coming, but you may not care about these

Can you guess where this new vehicle for potential adverts - or suggestions, as Microsoft call them - might be? Score a point if you were thinking of the Microsoft Store, as this is where the software giant is making its latest move in the world of promotional activity within Windows 11.

Although we should note that the idea is still in testing - in the Beta channel for Windows Insiders to be precise - it involves suggestions popping up when you search for apps or games in the Microsoft Store.

Continue reading: Don't want more ads in Windows 11? Well, more could be coming, but you may not care about these (full post)

Respawn reverses incredibly unpopular Apex Legends decision

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Jul 24, 2024 1:31 PM CDT

Electronic Arts and Respawn have reversed one of the most unpopular business decisions in recent memory.

Respawn reverses incredibly unpopular Apex Legends decision

A bit ago, Respawn revealed a new battle pass for Apex Legends, the live service FPS darling that has generated billions of revenue since launching in 2019. There was one big change to Season 22's battle pass: Gamers could no longer spend Apex Coins to get the premium battle pass. Instead, they'd have to shell out a flat $9.99 for S22's premium battle pass.

This predictably led to mass backlash among the Apex faithful. The push for heavier monetization comes at a retraction point in the games industry, with nearly every single video games company on the planet shrinking its employee base with mass layoffs in order to maximize revenues and profits. EA is no different--the company shed itself of thousands of workers despite making $7.1 billion in revenue in FY23; "During FY24, EA returned $1.505 billion to stockholders," reads the company's latest financial report.

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Capcom won't eliminate physical games despite digital making up 93% of all game sales

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Jul 24, 2024 12:43 PM CDT

As the games industry moves towards digital-based game sales, Japanese publisher Capcom has no plans to discontinue physical disc-based games any time soon.

Capcom won't eliminate physical games despite digital making up 93% of all game sales

While digital sales are taking over gaming, physical media remains an important part of the $180 billion interactive entertainment industry. Consumers still buy millions of discs a year at retailers like Walmart, Target, and Amazon, and publishers like Capcom, Electronic Arts, and even Sony Interactive Entertainment are still keen on producing disc-based games.

In a recent Q&A with shareholders, Japanese publisher Capcom was asked how the company plans to deal with the increasing digital-based needs of consumers. Capcom's answer was pretty clear-cut: The firm will continue delivering physical games as long as there is demand.

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CrowdStrike offers $10 Uber Eats gift cards to Windows outage victims

Jak Connor | Software & Apps | Jul 24, 2024 11:32 AM CDT

CrowdStrike, the cybersecurity company that was responsible for rolling out a faulty driver update to its software that caused 8.5 million Windows machines to enter endless blue screen of death boot loops is now offering customers $10 Uber Eats gift cards as a way of saying sorry for the inconvenience.

CrowdStrike offers $10 Uber Eats gift cards to Windows outage victims

Reports indicate CrowdStrike is sending out emails to its partners offering a $10 Uber Eats gift card as an apology. Multiple sources have reported receiving these emails from the cybersecurity company, with one source speaking to Tech Crunch and saying CrowdStrike recognizes the "additional work that the July 19 incident has caused" and for that "your next cup of coffee or late night snack is on us!"

Unfortunately, reports indicate some users receiving these codes aren't able to redeem them successfully, with some partners reporting that upon activation of the code the following error message presented itself: the gift card "has been canceled by the issuing party and is no longer valid."

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Google backpedals on decision to completely remove third-party cookies

Jak Connor | Internet & Websites | Jul 24, 2024 11:01 AM CDT

Google has announced that it will no longer continue with its plan to completely phase out third-party cookies on its Chrome browser and will instead take a more user-friendly approach.

Google backpedals on decision to completely remove third-party cookies

Google's Privacy Sandbox VP Anthony Chavez wrote the announcement and explained Google has received concerns from developers, privacy advocates, regulators, publishers, and others about the removal of third-party cookies. Google has heard this feedback and has come up with a new plan that won't include the complete removal of third-party cookies, which allows companies to serve targeted advertisements to users based on the activity of the user around other parts of the internet.

Notably, Google said back in 2020 that it was working toward blocking all third-party cookies in 2024, and the company even tested the removal in January when 1% of Chrome users had all third-party cookies blocked. The concerns from regulators come from the UK's Competition and Markets Authority, which is likely concerned Google will favor its own profits in advertisements if third-party cookies are blocked.

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CrowdStrike blames own test software for causing global Windows meltdown

Jak Connor | Software & Apps | Jul 24, 2024 10:02 AM CDT

CrowdStrike, the cybersecurity company behind one of, if not the biggest IT outage in history, has explained where it went wrong after pushing out an update to its malware software that nuked a staggering 8.5 million Windows machines.

CrowdStrike blames own test software for causing global Windows meltdown

The update was released last Friday, and approximately 8.5 million Windows machines were thrown into infinite boot loops with blue screens of death, impacting many aspects of everyday society, such as airlines, supermarkets, telecommunications, emergency services, and more. Since then, CrowdStrike has been quiet on how it missed the faults within the driver throughout internal testing, which it has now explained in a new update.

Here's how it works. CrowdStrike's Falcon Sensor, the software that was updated and ultimately led to the global outage, uses what is called "Sensor Content," which is software that defines what Falcon Sensor is capable of. The software is updated with "Rapid Response Content" which is designed to enable the software to detect and collect information on any new threats.

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Intel confirms fears about its biggest failure in years

Jak Connor | CPU, APU & Chipsets | Jul 24, 2024 9:32 AM CDT

Intel recently confirmed it has found the root cause of the instability problems reported by users of its 13th and 14th Gen CPUs, but, unfortunately, the chipmaker has made things quite confusing with a convoluted and seemingly contradictory response.

Intel confirms fears about its biggest failure in years

Intel officially published a statement about the instability reports for its Raptor Lake and Raptor Lake Refresh CPUs in the 13th and 14th Gen families. These instability reports have been stacking up for months now, and very little has been done on Intel's part to provide remedies for customers of the affected products or an explanation as to why the faults are occurring. Now, we have official confirmation from Intel that excessive voltage and oxidation are part of the problem.

The chipmaker posted a statement about the instability problems, citing an issue in the microcode algorithm that is causing incorrect voltage requests to the processor, resulting in elevated voltages. Intel said it was targeting mid-August for a microcode algorithm update. Notably, this statement didn't mention anything about oxidation, leading many to believe voltage was the root cause, and general instability problems will all be ironed out in an update in August.

Continue reading: Intel confirms fears about its biggest failure in years (full post)

Scientists discover 'dark oxygen' and break the theory of human evolution

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Jul 24, 2024 8:03 AM CDT

A team of researchers discovered a new source of oxygen at the bottom of the ocean, and it's discovery has led to more questions being asked than answered.

Scientists discover 'dark oxygen' and break the theory of human evolution

The discovery was detailed in a new paper published in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience, which explains the new oxygen source is called "dark oxygen," which is likely a reference to dark matter in astronomy as it can be measured but not seen. Much like dark matter, researchers first discovered dark oxygen when they discovered oxygen levels at the seafloor were rising, which would be impossible at depths of 13,000 feet, particularly without any photosynthetic processes.

"When we first got this data, we thought the sensors were faulty because every study ever done in the deep sea has only seen oxygen being consumed rather than produced. We would come home and recalibrate the sensors but over the course of 10 years, these strange oxygen readings kept showing up," said Biogeochemist Andrew Sweetman from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS)

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