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Antazone AS-C1000 HSF - Installation

Today we look at a CPU heatsink fan from a new company called Antazone. Are jet engine looks for you? If so, read on!

| CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Oct 2, 2006 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 7.5%Manufacturer: Antazone

Installation Notes

 

 

The Antazone AS-C1000 is compatible with most motherboard types, including AMD K7 and K8 systems, as well as Intel P4 and LGA775 based systems. Our testing will consist of an AMD K8 based system so your installation process may differ a bit from mine.

 

Note to K7 users: Make sure your motherboard has mounting hole surrounding the socket or you will not be able to mount this product. Many older designs did not include these mounting holes, so check before you buy!

 

Above you will see our starting point. The test board is a DFI LanParty board for the Socket 939 processors. The stock mounting screws have already been removed and the yellow support bracket is ready to be removed. Also remember to remove the support block on the bottom of the motherboard for those that include it (like mine).

 

 

After removing the bracket, I am ready to begin installing the Antazone cooler. Above is one of the mounts that came with this product. The one to use on the base of the motherboard MUST be the one with the foam. This keeps the mounting system from shorting out the solder points located under the processor socket. Since you now know that there is a difference, let's insert the base mount through the motherboard.

 

 

There we go...so far, so good. At this point the base bracket and the screws are simply resting in the holes of the motherboard. For those with motherboard that have four holes surrounding the socket, the other arm will move and you can align the bracket to make use of all four holes. K8 boards only have two holes, so the other arm is just positioned to be out of the way.

 

 

Turning the board over shows the two posts coming through the board. Again, if your motherboard has four holes, then you should have four posts coming through the mainboard. Now to install the processor and some AS5.

 

 

Whew! That was a good deal more difficult than I had imagined. When installing the sink itself, make sure to take note of the small hole in the top of the heatsink base and the small teat that protrudes from the bottom of the upper bracket. This teat must lock into the hole atop the base to make sure the cooler is properly aligned on the processor. This is also used as a means of locking the sink into place so it does not move around during operation. While the concept is simple, the execution is a bit more challenging. Between keeping the mainboard at an angle as to prevent the mounting bracket from falling out, and the proper aligning of the cooler, and making sure the teat gets in the hole on the top of the heatsink base, and getting a free hand to actually turn the mounting screws... well, I think you can see where this is leading. If you were gifted with a third hand or have a buddy standing by to help install the cooler, it will be pretty simple. If you are on your own, be prepared for a challenge. It is possible (I did it alone just to make sure it could be done), but it will be a little tough.

 

 

The photo above is from the side and shows that there is ample clearance for the memory modules and capacitors. There should be no issues with motherboard layout interference since the height of this cooler is well above the level these items normally reside.

 

One final note for installation deals with proper case airflow. Since we always want cool air coming in from the lower front and exhaust to leave the case from the upper rear, you should orient this cooler so that the fan direction is blowing toward your rear exhaust fan. This will help keep a proper airflow moving through your case.

Cooler Master Hyper 6+ CPU Heatsink & Fan

 

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