TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,004 Reviews & Articles | 38,749 News Posts

Gigabyte 3D Rocket II HSF - Installation

Gigabyte's latest monster CPU heatsink, the "3D Rocket II", has been tested and we compare to other big name coolers.

| CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Sep 19, 2006 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 9.0%Manufacturer: Gigabyte

Installation Notes

 

When it comes to installing a heatsink, the ease is usually determined by the type of processor being used. Since I am testing on an AMD based S939 system, I have come to expect everything from very simple to massively complex installations. The 3D Rocket II falls into the very simple category. Motherboard removal is certainly not required, but you will need to make sure that the plastic bracket that surrounds the processor block is firmly secured in place. You will not be needing this for the installation; you just need it to be there.

 

 

Remember, this particular model comes equipped with brackets that work for nearly all current processor types. Since the test system is AMD based, the installation notes may differ from your own system.

 

That said, the K8 mount is a matter of simplicity. It slides through the open riser portion of the cooler, then fits over the lugs of the bracket. It is slightly reminiscent of the old Socket A days, but the mount in this case has a latch that locks the heatsink firmly in place. After installation I noted no movement in the cooler, even when standing the case up and allowing gravity to come into play. It is very stable and should have no problems residing in your system in any position.

 

NOTE: Due to the weight involved with this cooling solution, I highly recommend you remove this cooler before moving the system for LAN play or moving. While the unit is very stable, the weight may be too much for the restraint system to handle if the system is moved or bounced around.

 

 

The shot above shows you what the cooler looks like from a straight down angle. While it is large, it doesn't appear to be too awkward mounted atop a DFI motherboard. Let's get a little different view, though.

 

 

This angle lets you see how the heatsink fits into a standard mid-sized tower case. The riser design makes sure that the MOSFETs and memory modules are cleared, so you should have no problems with fit unless you are using a SFF-type system. In that case you will want to make sure of your measurements before using this cooler...but then, that is not what it was designed for anyway.

GIGABYTE GH-PCU23-VE COPPER PLATE COOLING FAN

 

Further Reading: Read and find more Cases, Cooling & PSU content at our Cases, Cooling & PSU reviews, guides and articles index page.

Do you get our RSS feed? Get It!

Got an opinion on this content? Post a comment below!

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts
Check out TweakTown Polls on LockerDome on LockerDome

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases