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NZXT "Trinity" Enclosure Review - Exterior

Today Mike takes a look at a new enclosure from NZXT called "Trinity". The folks at NZXT are looking for something that still appeals to those who want an interesting look, but also has a more docile overall appearance. This doesn't mean that the case is automatically a dud, only that it doesn't glare at you with a robotic or alien face.

| Other Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jul 5, 2005 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 8.5%Manufacturer: NZXT

The Exterior

 

 

One glance and you already see that the tone of the Trinity is a good deal more tame than previous models put out by NZXT. While it may look a bit more traditional, it was still created by a group of folks who aim their product toward gamers and enthusiasts. But before we look at these interesting tidbits, lets take a gander at the outside of the box.

 

The front bezel is all plastic as is the front door panel. A faux chrome covering has been added to the front to give it a more elegant look, but there is no metal here. This is one of the few failings of the enclosure in my opinion. A metal front wears better than plastic and also gives a bit more balance to the entire system once it is installed in the case.

 

But even with the plastic front, it still strikes a good-looking pose as far as sheer appeal is concerned.

 

 

Once we open the front door we can see what we have to work with as far as optical devices are concerned. You'll find no real lack in this area, as there are five 5.25" bays available for your building pleasure. There is also a single externally accessible 3.5" bay so you can still have that floppy drive that is so handy when it comes time to Flash the mainboard BIOS. It was good to see only one small bay on this model. Zip drives have become very rare these days and there isn't a lot of reason to waste space for a second 3.5" external device.

 

 

As we look a little lower on the front bezel we see a small LCD display that allows us to monitor the interior temperature. This display is connected to a single thermal probe that you can attach anywhere, so you can use it to keep tabs on the processor temperature, the video board, the hard drive, or just the inside temperature of the case.

 

Also of note is that the triangular shaped button is your power switch. This gives you the ability to start up your system without having to open the front panel. The reset button is inside the door and is circular, so it shouldn't be too hard to tell them apart.

 

 

Moving to the side of the enclosure shows us a full sized window as well as a NZXT custom fan grill over the lighted 80mm fan. While the case itself is made of steel, you'll find more of the false chrome plastic surrounding the window. It doesn't add any structural integrity to the case, but it does give it a flashy look that isn't bad looking at all.

 

 

Turning the corner to the back side of the enclosure shows us a pretty standard layout. We've talked about this before; there isn't too much innovation you can use here without taking away the ability to accommodate an industry standard motherboard. But there is one item of interest...

 

 

Take a closer look at the rear fan mount. Those diagonally positioned holes allow you a great deal of flexibility with regards to the fan you use here. While the default enclosure is shipped with an 80mm fan, this mount will also fit a 92mm or 120mm fan of your choosing. This is also a handy feature if you're thinking of adding a water cooling setup with a case-mounted radiator.

 

 

Finishing up our tour of the exterior of the Trinity brings us to the right side and the front I/O ports. Included here you see a pair of USB ports (2.0 of course), a headphone jack and a microphone jack. An IEEE1394 Firewire port is missing from the picture, but it seems that this is another one of those little things that are falling by the wayside anymore. From an enthusiast viewpoint, one of the few reasons to even consider this port is an external storage device.

 

You'll also see another vent for cooling. Hiding under the side panel is a space for either an 80mm or 92mm fan. Just be careful in using this mount, however, as it is close to the front fan mount. While it can be used to add cooling for the hard drive bays, a fan with too much power could disrupt the airflow from the front fan.

 

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