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HP Z Turbo 512GB PCIe SSD Review - With RAID 0 Numbers

By: Chris Ramseyer | SSDs in Storage | Posted: Dec 13, 2014 12:15 am
TweakTown Rating: 93%Manufacturer: HP

Futuremark PCMark 8 Extended - Consistency Test

 

Version and / or Patch Used: 2.0.228

 

Heavy Usage Model:

 

Futuremark's PCMark 8 allows us to wear the test drive down to a reasonable consumer steady state, and then watch the drive recover on its own through garbage collection. To do that, the drive gets pushed down to steady state with random writes, and then idle time between a number of tests allows the drive to recover.

 

Precondition Phase:

1. Write to the drive sequentially through up to the reported capacity with random data.

2. Write the drive through a second time (to take care of overprovisioning).

 

Degradation Phase:

1. Run writes of random size between 8*512 and 2048*512 bytes on random offsets for ten minutes.

2. Run performance test (one pass only).

3. Repeat one and two, eight times, and on each pass, increase the duration of random writes by five minutes.

 

Steady state Phase:

1. Run writes of random size between 8*512 and 2048*512 bytes on random offsets for 50 minutes.

2. Run performance test (one pass only).

3. Repeat one and two, five times.

 

Recovery Phase:

1. Idle for five minutes.

2. Run performance test (one pass only).

3. Repeat one and two, five times.

 

PCMark 8's Consistency test provides a ton of data output that we use to judge a drive's performance. Here we see the three states of performance for the select SSDs, light use, consumer steady state, and worst case.

 

Storage Bandwidth - All Tests

 

hp-turbo-512gb-pcie-ssd-review-raid-numbers_64

 

 

Storage Bandwidth - Heavy Load

 

hp-turbo-512gb-pcie-ssd-review-raid-numbers_65

 

 

Storage Bandwidth - Typical Consumer Load

 

hp-turbo-512gb-pcie-ssd-review-raid-numbers_66

 

The HP Z820 we are using for our tests today will not allow the system to boot from the Z Turbo since we can't set a pure UEFI environment. Newer systems based on Haswell and Haswell-E shouldn't have the same issue. So, while our Ivy Bridge-E system can't actually run with the Z Turbo as a boot device, we still ran these tests to see how newer HP workstations would perform with a Z Turbo in a boot environment.

 

The drive does well, but the standard XP941 is still a bit faster; this is most likely due to the drive being tested in two different systems. Under typical consumer workloads, consumer systems are a bit faster since the cores have a higher clock rate. Workstations like the Z820 we're testing with today have a lower clock speed per core, but have more cores to handle more work running at the same time.

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