Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
7,253 Reviews & Articles | 52,647 News Posts

Lian Li PC-Q36 Mini-Tower Chassis Review

By: Chad Sebring | Small Form Factor Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Aug 7, 2014 2:18 am
TweakTown Rating: 94%Manufacturer: Lian Li

Case Build and Finished Product




At this point we have the chassis stripped down to its essentials, without removing any of the vertical support structures. With the drive bays, panels, and motherboard tray all out of the way, you can simply set the PSU gently on top of the rails, instead of trying to jam it in from the sides.




It is also a great idea to pre-wire the leads to the PSU before you move too much further into the build. They specify that there is room for much more PSU than what we installed, but if you want to keep the storage bays, you need to look into much shorter power supplies.




With most of the gear in place, we did remove the HDDs entirely due to the conflict, and it made life much easier. We still saw a bit of sag to the chassis, and it is flimsier when unassembled, but it is very solid structurally once it is all back together.




While we do not have a dust shield for the ASRock motherboard, we did snap one in for testing, and have no issues to report. We also did not use a video card for this build, and we opted for an AIO, but even there, no issues arose. We also had no issues with the PSU.




Next to the motherboard tray, there is a few millimeters of space to allow for some of the wiring to be kept, and with the AIO almost covering the PCI-e slot, we do not see a card in this build. This again shows that longer PSUs can be an issue, as we had just enough room in front of it to tend to our wiring.




We now have the PC-Q36 all back together, and this is when the brilliance of the acrylic top panel comes into play. Unlike other cases, the PC-Q36 offers a full view of all of the components.




Stepping back slightly, we can now take in the PC-Q36 in full perspective. We do like the front window, but in most instances, you will only see the memory and cooler, and possibly the top of the video card. In ours, we see tubing up front, but we get a full view of the motherboard as well.




Once powered, we found the fan at the back runs in the 40dB range with full power; of course, this can be controlled if desired. We also like that we can see the head unit lit up, and this just makes us want to add LEDs, and more shiny things to show off in this chassis.

    PRICING: You can find products similar to this one for sale below.

    United States: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon's website.

    United Kingdom: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon UK's website.

    Canada: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon Canada's website.

    We at TweakTown openly invite the companies who provide us with review samples / who are mentioned or discussed to express their opinion of our content. If any company representative wishes to respond, we will publish the response here.

Related Tags

Got an opinion on this content? Post a comment below!