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Phanteks Enthoo Pro Full-Tower Chassis Review

Phanteks Enthoo Pro Full-Tower Chassis Review
Phanteks offers its second take on a full-tower chassis with the Enthoo Pro; a simplified, and more refined version of the Enthoo Primo. Here's our review.
| Full-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jul 17, 2014 10:10 pm
TweakTown Rating: 99%Manufacturer: Phanteks

Introduction, Specifications and Pricing

 

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Of course, Phanteks has been widely known for their CPU coolers over the years. Phanteks took what was essentially a Noctua cooler at the beginning, and did what everyone asked for in the first place by offering different colors than what Noctua stayed true to all these years. What some of you may have missed, or have since forgotten about, is that Phanteks is also in the chassis game, and has been since the release of their first chassis, the Enthoo Primo. This case was oversized, modular, and a perfect chassis to not only hide wiring for a clean finished product, but with some innovative additions to the design, Phanteks also offered the first chassis we had seen that would also hide the majority of a water loop for the ultimate experience in cleanly built PCs.

 

By sprinting out of the gate with one of the most innovative and unique chassis designs we had ever seen before, Phanteks made their job really tough trying to follow that act. Well, it seems that the original design wasn't such a huge aesthetic hit, but with Phanteks' newest Enthoo, we get a lot of what made the Primo such a hit, yet inside of a completely new design. This new design offers just a bit of styling to distinguish its heritage, yet it has an almost Corsair Obsidian-like appeal.

 

All of this boils down to the reason you are here, and still reading this article: you are interested in what this Phanteks Enthoo Pro is all about. Well, we are here today to find out just that. If even half of this design is similar to the Primo, and it offers most of the same tricks, we honestly don't see how they could go wrong, but that is part of what we plan to cover as we get up close and personal with this Enthoo Pro full-tower chassis from Phanteks.

 

Phanteks provides what have to be the most thorough charts we have seen on any product to date. They start by offering the dimensions, form factor, and details on the steel and plastic used to build this full-tower chassis. Inside of the chassis, there is room for the usual Micro-ATX and ATX, but in this design not only is EATX not an issue, but even SSI-EEB motherboards are good to go. We are also informed of the USB 3.0, USB 2.0, and the HD Audio connectivity of the front I/O panel. They also describe the dual windows in the side panel, and that there is an optional PSU cover, which is in the chassis we have.

 

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The next section covers the eight expansion slots, the trio of 5.25" bays, and the six 3.5" bays. It also explains that all 3.5" locations are ready for 2.5" drives; plus, there is a tray behind the motherboard tray. Moving into the cooling, we find that the front of the chassis can house two 120mm fans, three 140mm fans, or the 200mm fan Phanteks has installed, but of course, not all at once. The front follows the same rules of fit for the 200mm fan they include, but it can house three 120mm or 140mm fans. The rear of the chassis offers room for a 120mm or 140mm fan, and it also has slits to adjust this fan's vertical alignment. The floor has the potential to hold either a pair of 120mm fans or a single 140mm fan, and even the HDD cage has room for a pair of 120mm fans on the inside of the racks. You can also get an idea of the radiator support with the section that follows.

 

Limitations on this design are not really limitations at all. There is 347mm of room for video cards with the hard drives in play, and without them there is 472mm of room. They also mention the 193mm CPU cooler height limitation, but in our time here, we have yet seen a cooler that tall anyways. The last mention is of the amount of room behind the motherboard tray, and as stated, there is 27mm of room to pack in the wiring and keep everything clean. Outside of the 200mm fan specifications, and the weight of this chassis, at the bottom, we find that Phanteks stands by their chassis for a term of five years.

 

While the Enthoo Primo was a design that made you dig deep into your wallet for the sum of near $250, when it comes to the Enthoo Pro, things are much different. This full-tower design can be had for just about $99 at just about any location this product is listed, and most places currently offer free shipping as well. That is in no way to say that you should expect to see some stripped down, watery version of the Enthoo Primo in this design. We feel that once you wrap your mind around what is going on in and around this chassis, you will find the Enthoo Pro hard to pass up when looking for a new full-tower chassis.

 

 

PRICING: You can find the Phanteks Enthoo Pro for sale below. The prices listed are valid at the time of writing, but can change at any time. Click the link to see the very latest pricing for the best deal.

 

United States: The Phanteks Enthoo Pro with optional windows retails for $99.99 at Amazon, and the Phanteks Enthoo Pro without windows retails for $89.99 at Amazon.

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