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NZXT H230 Mid-Tower Chassis Review - The Build and Finished Product

NZXT H230 Mid-Tower Chassis Review
NZXT delivers the H230, a new mid-tower with sound absorbing material to silently cool those mid-tower builds, and at a good price as well.
| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Sep 12, 2013 2:01 am
TweakTown Rating: 91%Manufacturer: NZXT

The Build and Finished Product

 

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Removing the front bezel just takes a tug at the bottom and the entire door and assembly pops right off. Behind the bezel you see the filter of mesh in the front and on the side, and you can now see the single front 120mm fan that NZXT installs for you.

 

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Adding a drive does not require the removal of the bezel, I just wanted to move the fan up first. Then all I had to do was remove the bay cover, slide in the DVD drive, and make sure the clip on the side locks properly into place to secure it. Again I just want to say, I am glad this door swings the proper direction.

 

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Even with this long HD 7950 cooler, I could have left the top section of bays in place and had plenty of room left. I just thought removing it is what most users will do, so I did. As for the rest of the build, the motherboard fits as it should, and wiring it was a breeze, leaving a very clean looking build.

 

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The rear I/O dust shield pops right in, and I had no issues with the chassis flexing and messing with the expansion slots alignment. The bend at the bottom isn't that bad, and you can see the PSU still installs without having to fix it.

 

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It surprised me to see how simple the back of the chassis is to wire and keep clean. All of the front I/O wiring tucks in with the SATA power lead, and even the 24-pin for the motherboard fits back here, without causing conflicts with the door panel or its padding.

 

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When the H230 is all back together and ready to be powered up and tested, one of the nicest things is that what you buy is what you get. Nothing I added to the build detracts from that original design and style, and with this chassis, I really like that simplicity about it.

 

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Even when the H230 is powered on, it is very hard to tell anything is going on at all. If it weren't for the post beep and the dim white LED that backlights the power button, there is nothing that screams that the H230 is running. With the choice of Noctua cooler and the way this chassis is designed, you have to put your ear within six inches of the chassis to even hear it running.

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