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TP-Link WDR4300 N750 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router Review - What's In the Box and Setup

TP-Link WDR4300 N750 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router Review
Is TP-Link's TL-WD4300 N750 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router a diamond in the networking rough at just $79? Let's find out.
| Routers & Access Points in Networking | Posted: Jul 29, 2013 11:01 pm
TweakTown Rating: 90%Manufacturer: TP-Link

What's In The Box

 

Let's take a look at what TP-Link provide in the box, but for $79, I'm not expecting much.

 

As you can see in the below images, we have the WDR4300 itself, the power supply, three antennas (which I've already attached to the WDR4300), a Quick Installation Guide, a TP-Link Purchasing Guide, a Resource CD, a General Public License Notice and another Purchasing Guide.

 

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Setup

 

This is where things can get very different for most people. Remember, this is just a wireless router - there is no modem inside, so you'll need to have a modem to begin with. I'm based in Australia and I'm using ADSL, with Billion's 7800N modem/router.

 

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I own a 16-port Netgear Gigabit switch and a 6-bay QNAP NAS. I have the Billion 7800N, QNAP NAS and TP-Link TL-WDR4300 all plugged into my Netgear switch. The Billion modem has a forced, static IP address and has a DHCP server running, which feeds out IP addresses to all of my devices.

 

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This means that when setting the TL-WDR4300 up, I had to disable its internal DHCP server and manually push it to another IP range. By default, it runs at 192.168.0.1, but my IP range at home is 192.168.1.x. This took a little while to figure out, because it was giving me a correct WAN address, but my LAN address was wrong.

 

This meant I could access the Internet, but I couldn't access anything on my network - such as my NAS. I figured out the issue after a few strong drinks, cuss words, and dinner. I had the Ethernet cable plugged into the "Internet" port on the TL-WDR4300, when it just needs to be plugged into one of the four Gigabit ports - silly me.

 

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Every set up is different, so I'm not going to bore you with the whole "this is how you set it up" thing just yet. But... if this is something you'd like to see from us, please do let me know and I'll write another page up on our next review with a guide on how to get you going. These days modem/router's have setup CDs that will guide you all the way through, and this unit is no exception - you get one in the box, I just have a more complicated setup and didn't need to use it.

 

Before we get into the numbers, we'll take a look at the User Interface (UI) of TP-Link's WDR4300. It's actually quite detailed, but for the most part, you won't need to do make changes in it. Most of your routing functions will be handled automatically, or you would have already set this up through your modem.

 

In order to access this part of the modem, you'll need to visit the following IP address: http://192.168.0.1 - this can be changed, but this is the one you'll need by default.

 

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We'll show you some of the more important parts of the UI, but you'll really need to familiarize yourself, as there are some very complicated settings, as there are with any networking product.

 

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There is obviously a Dual-Band option, where you can choose to opt for both bands or a single band only. This is more advanced, but I would keep both of them enabled, unless you're knowledgeable with networks.

 

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We also have the awesome USB sharing option on the WDR4300, which is just way too easy to setup. Plug it in, and then access the USB Settings of the WDR4300 and voila, you're ready to go.

 

Let's move onto our Wi-Fi testing, shall we?

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