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Comay Pluto SC3 Enterprise SSD Review

Comay Pluto SC3 Enterprise SSD Review

Comay's Pluto SC3 features an LSI SandForce 2481 controller in tandem with Intel 25nm MLC NAND. With enterprise class features, such as host power-loss protection and enhanced data security, and a low price point, this will make for a good option for the value-conscious.

| SSDs in IT/Datacenter | Posted: Apr 25, 2013 3:15 pm
TweakTown Rating: 88%      Manufacturer: CoreRise Electronics

Introduction

 

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The Comay Pluto SC3 is an enterprise MLC SSD powered by the LSI SandForce 2481 controller. The Pluto SC3 features impressive specifications of 555MB/s in sequential read and 530MB/s in sequential write speed. 4K random read weighs in at 82,000 IOPS and 4k random write speed is 69,000 IOPS.

 

Comay is the SSD division for the Chinese-based company CoreRise. Comay is one of the world's largest manufacturers of SSDs. CoreRise features an extensive line of SSDs for enterprise, industrial, military and client environments. Comay spends considerable resources on R&D, and their broad background and manufacturing capability leads to many unique features for the Comay SSDs, lending extra reliability to the final product.

 

The primary focus of Comay is on quality and reliability. Comay has invested heavily in infrastructure to test and validate their products, utilizing standardized CR-M/I/E/C tests. The comprehensive testing includes environmental tests from -40C to +85C, burn-in tests, sleep-wake cycle testing (10,000 cycles), and character and compatibility testing.

 

Extensive validation and unique features are important in a market that has more than its fair share of SandForce powered SSDs. The ubiquitous SandForce controller makes it easy for manufacturers to create and market their own SSDs, but has also led to a plethora of very similar SSD offerings. Comay has created differentiation in their design by making significant departures from SandForce reference PCB designs.

 

Power fail protection is necessary when protecting user data and Comay addresses this with their Cap-X system. This large capacitor provides up to four seconds of power for the SSD to commit all data in transit to the NAND. LSI SandForce controllers do not utilize DRAM for operation, and along with fewer components, one advantage of forgoing DRAM usage is lessening of the impact of power failure. SandForce SSDs already have only a 1/1000 possibility of data loss without power protection, but the additional super capacitor extends this protection even further.

 

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The power circuitry on Comay SSDs feature premium components and overvoltage protection. The overload protection provides security against power surges, short circuit and static electricity discharges. Robust power delivery systems on SSDs are critical, as the majority of premature SSD failures originate from power delivery circuitry failures.

 

Another interesting feature with the Comay SSDs is a cooling system for the PCB, consisting of metal strips that allow the PCB to dissipate heat away from the PCB. Comay also provides their customers with the Comay SSD Toolbox software, which allows for easy firmware updating, secure erasure and monitoring of the SSD. Enhanced SMART data aids in monitoring of the SSD and is helpful for predictive failure analysis.

 

The LSI SF-2481 is an enterprise-class controller that features an UBER rating 1/10th of the standard SF-2281 controller. The Pluto SC3 utilizes double ECC in the form of BCH 33bit/512byte ECC. With RAISE providing an extra layer of data protection from lost sectors, pages and blocks, Comay has the bases covered for data integrity; let's take a look at the specifications.

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