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Koolance EXOS External Water Cooling System Review - Features Continued

Computers aren't getting cooler, and as this is true, we are seeing more and more water cooling products hit the market place as the said style of product slowly gets closer to becoming a mainstream commodity. Today Cameron "Sov" Johnson takes a look at the Koolance EXOS External Water Cooling System. How does the near silent system compare to air cooling? Read on!

| CPU Liquid Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Sep 30, 2003 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 8.0%Manufacturer: Koolance

Features of the Koolance EXOS Continued

 

The front of the EXOS system is where you can control some of the various features. Here you can set your temp display from C to F, which is great considering this product ships all around the world. The only other button on the front is the speed control for the fan. Simply, this is a button connected to a small computer inside. You have setting one, which is lowest power, setting two is thermal control; this means it adjusts speeds of the fan and water pump according to the temperature read off the sensor and setting three which gives 100% operation 100% of the time. While giving the best cooling of them all, it is extremely loud.

 

 

Now we take a look at the reservoir and fill port. Koolance keeps the reservoir exposed so you can keep your eye on the water level within the cooling system. This is especially handy when you have to chance the coolant. You will know this as the color will go from a yellowish tinge to a clear water color. At this stage its time to drain out the old coolant and top it up with some new water wetter or something in the same category. One thing I did find annoying was the fill port location. Koolance uses a rubber sealed screw plug located on the bottom of the unit to add water and coolant additives. In order to fill the unit, you have to actually tip the unit onto its back. This prevents you from operating the unit to remove air bubbles, as the intake is at the bottom, where the air bubbles get trapped. This really was the only bad point.

 

 

Above we see one of the best points about the external system, quick connects. Like the HydroCool from Corsair, Koolance used a quick release water pipe system. This allows you to disconnect the radiator unit from the pipes leading to the PC without spilling any coolant out of the radiator or from the pipes.

 

Installation

 

Installation of the unit was the simplest thing I have ever done.

 

Firstly I filled the unit up with the coolant and distilled water. Don't worry about a few air bubbles as the units water pickup is on the bottom, so when tipped up the right way, the bubbles float to the top. After securing the fill cap, I moved onto the actual system. I installed the motherboard and other components as normal but without the heatsink. I attacked the Koolance CPU-200 water block to the CPU with the supplied thermal grease which works much better in water cooled situations than AS3 since it won't solidify under cold conditions that the water can reach. Then the thermal probe was inserted into the stack on the waterblock to monitor the temperature of the water for thermally controlled operations. After the unit was attached with the retention knob, we moved onto the piping and SCM installation.

 

The SCM was installed into the upper-most expansion slot as our board's AGP slot is lower down, this made for a great exit point without obstructing the video cards cooling. The SCM was attached to the PSU via the Molex connector for its power and then connected to the case power switch and the Motherboard power pins.

 

Then we took the pipe and cut it in half. We threaded the two ends through the SCM slot connector which has two special ports for the pipes to pass through. After this, we simply plugged the hoses onto the barbs of the Waterblock and secured them with the provided hose clamps, this assured us that they pipes won't come off under pressure and destroy our system. On the ends, outside the case, we attached the quick release ports to prevent leakage when disconnecting the unit in the future.

 

Now all that was left was to power up allowing the water to pump through the waterblock and add extra water to compensate for the extra water taken out to fill the block.

 

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