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Thermaltake Xaser III Super Tower Case Review - Miscellaneous

Are you finally ready to graduate from those cheap $50 cases? Are you prepared to look more into quality than price? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then it may just be time to look toward Thermaltake. Come join Mike "Darthtanion" Wright as he tales a look at the Xaser III Super Tower Enclosure from Thermaltake. It has airflow, features and some other nice surprises that might be just what the doctor ordered. Come check it out!

| Super-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Apr 12, 2003 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 9.0%Manufacturer: Thermaltake

Miscellaneous Stuff

 

The following little snippets don't really have a category of their own, so I'll just group them together. While not life-changing, they are little things that help give you a more complete picture of this case and what it has to offer.

 

 

To start things off, we'll point out a few added things that come along with this case when it ships. The backplate is no surprise and neither is the bag of screws and extra standoffs for mounting the motherboard. But there are a couple of items that are out of the ordinary.

 

The cable you see on top is for that high-speed fan that doesn't come with a 4-pin Molex connector. If you're like me, you have a bunch of converters sitting around your work area, but very few of them allow you to monitor fan speeds. The cable shown hooks into the 3-pin power cord and then allows you to use a regular 4-pin converter to power the fan. It also has a single yellow strand hooked to a 3-pin cable that you can attach to a vacant motherboard header to let you monitor fan speeds.

 

Also of note is that there is an extra battery included. This battery is for the HardCano unit as this is what powers the LCD display. It is unusual for an extra battery to be added, and it is a welcome change.

 

And speaking of that LCD display, we never saw it working. Let's change that.

 

 

The bottom temperature shown is what is being picked up by the probe. The probe has the very thin wires to allow it to be attached to the bottom of the processor. From there, you just set the temperature alarm limit and you're set. If the temperature being read by the probe ever gets to the alarm level, it lets you know. To adjust the alarm level, just use a small screwdriver to adjust the blue insert that is on the bottom right of the display.

 

You can also record temperatures if you're so inclined. And the HardCano unit even has an On/Off switch. This has been something that has been missing from their previous models. In order to turn any of the probes off, you had to physically remove the battery.

 

 

If you'll remember the front of the case, you'll recall that there is a label with the Thermaltake name on the lower front panel of the case. Many might think it is nothing more than a brand name screwed to the front, but if you check it out in the dark you'll see that it is actually a low intensity LED display. Just another of those little things that help this case stand out.

 

 

Another little addition is a pair of clips that are attached to the HDD dive bays. These clips will work great for keeping any wires in this area out of the way and securely mounted to the side of the bay. While it may not sound like much, it was a big help when it came time to start tucking wires inside the case.

 

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