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Cooler Master Test Bench V1.0 Open Air Chassis Review - The Build and Finished Product

I needed a chassis to fit my needs that inspired an idea. Today lies what could be the ideal ticket.

| Open Air Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Mar 18, 2011 5:16 pm
TweakTown Rating: 86%Manufacturer: Cooler Master

The Build and Finished Product

 

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I went ahead and installed the power supply, the optical drive and the 3.5" hard drive and got all of the wiring ready to install the motherboard. As you can see, both of the large holes work well for running the wiring to appropriate section of the motherboard, for easy and clean looking connectivity.

 

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With very little effort I sat the motherboard on top of the plastic risers. They slide about halfway down due to the weight of the board, but require a gentle push to seat them properly. The other four brass risers I simply added a screw to. With some good planning and some careful wire tucking underneath, you end up with a very clean looking system.

 

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Getting down to eye level you can see with my setup there is a bit more room for tucking wires and routing the cables. If you were to use two 5.25" devices and the 2.5" drive in the back, wiring would be much tougher to hide in my opinion.

 

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Something I really liked in this design is that the power and reset buttons are right near the power supply switch and plug. Convenience is the key here! As this is a Test Bench, quick access to the power switch without having to blindly feel for it behind the chassis is very nice to see.

 

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I would strongly recommend use of a modular power supply for such a small unit. As you can see, if I had those extra wires hardwired to the unit, I would be hiding a rats nest back here. Something I noticed as well is that the base could have used a fifth foot. One in the center of the chassis would have kept the floor from deflecting under the weight of the power supply.

 

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With the ATX board installed you can see the Test Bench V1.0 is only slightly bigger in the foot print it is going to use on the desktop. With the power wire running out the back along with all the motherboard connectivity on the back of the chassis, even the USB and monitor cables should be out of the way and make for a clutter free testing environment.

 

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I did power up the chassis to test the functionality of the power switches and just to make sure I didn't short anything out. While this unit does not offer the water cooling capabilities of the Banchetto 101, it doesn't have a cooler clearance issue as did the Pit Stop due to the carrying handle. What you do get is a small, very usable product that can get the job done.

 

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