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Danger Den DD-GTX470 GPU Water Block - Installation and Finished Product

Need help cooling one of NVIDIA's new nuclear reactors? The DD-GTX470 from Danger Den offers a solution to keeping your Fermi Under control.

| CPU Liquid Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jun 26, 2010 6:44 am
TweakTown Rating: 93%Manufacturer: Danger Den

Installation and Finished Product

 

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The victims; a pair of EVGA GTX 470 SC cards, that don't do that bad in clocking on air so far, but these two cards are some hot samples as you will see in the testing.

 

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Skipping ahead, as you can find how to remove the stock cooler in the Danger Den videos. Here we have one of the 470's completely cleaned with all the IC's cleaned and prepped, ready to accept the DD-GTX 470.

 

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Skipping ahead a little more, I have the IC's and the GPU die prepped with Ceramique. I also cut the membrane and placed it over the voltage regulators. In the video, he states it is much simpler to use one larger piece of material to group the chips than to place little individual pieces on each. I agree, as even getting these larger pieces on right took a bit of patience and a steady hand.

 

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I did a light pressure test fit to be sure that, one, I was getting correct contact, and two, to transfer the pads to the block. As you can see, all the IC's and the core make contact. This is also a good time to check to see if the correct amount of TIM is used.

 

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With the block installed the card takes on a much slimmer profile and I must say is an attractive end product. I ran into no clearance issues or any sort of oddities when placing the block and mounting it.

 

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On the outside edge, the fittings clear the card well. There is plenty of room to get the fittings or barbs in place, get the tubing on, and if needed get a clamp installed. If you weren't aware, the plugs sent in the blocks are reversible to which side they can be used on, the limitations are in the tube routing and fitting choices.

 

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Since my work rig is also what I game on, I lugged my case into the basement so I could get a good image of the cards installed. For those of you thinking the cards are in the wrong slots for 16x lanes, we aren't going for scores here and the x8 lane it uses shows very little, if any loss anyways.

 

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Since I wanted to test the cards by themselves, I needed a way to mock up and secure the loop. I plan to add more to the loop soon, but it wasn't fair to the testing to add it now, so this is what I ended up with.

 

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With everything hooked up and ready to test, I took this image waiting for the loop to bleed out.

 

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