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Scythe Yasya SCYS-1000 CPU Cooler - The Scythe Yasya CPU Cooler

Unique looks, nickel plating and one serious fan come together to give us the Scythe Yasya CPU cooler to test today. Let's see if it can perform!

| CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: May 11, 2010 7:34 am
TweakTown Rating: 91%Manufacturer: Scythe

The Scythe Yasya CPU Cooler

 

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Once out of all the protective layering, you can start to get an idea of the Trident Multi Layer Fin Structure and how that shapes the cooler. This cooler is stacked with all the tricks! Starting with a copper base and aluminium pre-cooler both covered in nickel, to the six staggered heat pipes, to the oddly shaped fins and finishing at the caps above, there is very little room for heat to hide.

 

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This angle was much more conducive to representing the fin design. There is no doubt, and no, it isn't an optical illusion, these fins, on both sides, are made like this. This design makes fifteen cavities, plus three halves at the top and bottom. These not only offer spacing for the 100 CFM fan to work more efficiently, but also help to channel the air better.

 

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The sides of the fins are left open and in the flat edge are grooves to allow for two fans to be installed.

 

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I know by now you have seen enough of the twelve chrome caps for the heat pipes, so I decided to show off the finish of the fins instead. The nickel plating offers a mirror-like reflection on the top of the cooler.

 

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For a lack of a better way to explain it, the base is constructed a bit like a direct touch cooler, but this time Scythe takes a nickel plated copper plate and solders it to the pre-cooler and pipes for direct transfer to all six pipes; something lost on direct touch coolers with this many pipes, as they usually don't all make good contact, as this plate does.

 

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The base plates Scythe uses are much larger than a processor. As with the Samurai ZZ, the Yasya suffers from the same edge roundness, but the centre is "relatively" flat. I say it that way, as the base is textured a bit.

 

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Scythe packages a 1900 CFM Slip Stream 120mm fan to partner with the Yasya. You can see there are two leads coming from the fan on this version, not just the typical four strand wire for the power and PWM control, but this time there is something a little extra.

 

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This Slip Stream fan has a dial type fan controller that can fit inside an empty expansion slot. The dial is large and should be easy to find behind your case. Setting labels such as "HIGH" an "LOW" makes it pretty self explanatory. With this you can control the fan with or without the PWM functional, so the fan control can be from almost not spinning, all the way up to a 1900 RPM frenzy of fan speed and up to 100CFM of air flow to handle the job.

 

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With the fan in position, the Slip Stream 120mm covers the high density of fins quite well. The channeling at the bottom allows for some air to be delivered to the pre-cooler, but at the top it does waste a bit. Simply passing my hand over the top, I could feel the loss of escaping air that could have helped performance, but I will let the numbers do the talking on this subject.

 

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I had to skip ahead and open the hardware to even mount the fan, as the wire clips seen here come in the box, too. This is the way the cooler will be tested, a single fan with fan controller set to high at all times, except for minimum sound testing.

 

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Just like with the Samurai ZZ, the Yasya uses the same VTMS pieces. They are connected to the base under the fan, so you may want to mount the cooler prior to the fan, as it does tend to be in the way for AMD and Intel mounting.

 

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