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Corsair Obsidian 700D Full Tower Chassis - The Build and Finished Product

Corsair brings us the second incarnation of the Obsidian Series chassis. This time we are looking at the 700D, the 800D's simpler personality.

| Full-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jan 1, 1970 12:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 90%      Manufacturer: Corsair

The Build and Finished Product

 

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A gentle tug at the bottom removed the front of the 700D and exposes the 5.25" bays for installation. I like that the front I/O panel stays on the chassis and keeps wires out of the picture. Due to the internal air flow the front of the Obsidian series is closed off allowing the 140mm fan in the bays to take the air up versus to the back. Lastly, the front bay covers just simply latch into place with two tabs. Gently release the tabs and the cover or covers of choice easily remove.

 

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What more can be said?! The Obsidian series is second to none with their wire management. If my count is correct I think I used a total of 5 ties to get this sort of look and I took very little time in doing it. Imagine what a bit of creativity can do for you here.

 

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Everything is in and ready for me to add the chord for power. The rear of the case ends up clean with the black PSU and GPU. Also, to the left you can see that the venting does get slowed down pretty good once wiring is done, but there is still room for any flow to make its way out the back of this vent.

 

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With a full ATX motherboard and GTS 250 installed; oh yeah, and a 1000 watt PSU, the case still looks empty. This is going to leave you with plenty of options for water cooling or adding any extras that may need hiding from the significant other until an anniversary.

 

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I installed the optical drive low for one reason; cable length! If you plan to use the top slots for optical and want to still hide the cabling, make sure you get some longer cables with the chassis. Standard length cables will work, but need to be exposed inside the chassis. With no side window it matters little to others, but when I pop off the door, I don't want to see them either.

 

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All powered up, here is what you are going to see. A white back lit power button indicates system power and aside from that you will see an occasional flash from the white LED for the HDD activity just below it. With a full panel on the side there is no looking inside to see what is going on. For me I like a window, but for my better half's computer, she doesn't care so much and the design will offset seeing inside for most builders.

 

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