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Cooler Master Storm Sniper Black Edition Mid-Tower Case - Inside The Cooler Master Storm Sniper Black Edition Mid Tower Case

Cooler Master sent me the Storm Sniper Black Edition chassis. Let's see how well the kill to death ratio plays out.

| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jan 7, 2010 3:28 am
TweakTown Rating: 91%Manufacturer: Cooler Master

Inside The Cooler Master Storm Sniper Black Edition Mid Tower Case

 

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As you can see, the panel is well ventilated and has a 200mm fan screwed onto the framework that supports the mesh. The mesh is just held in place with bent over bits that slip through the framework, and locks it in place enough not to rattle when in operation. The fan itself has two wire leads coming from it. One is for the fan power supply and the other is to connect to the LED power switch.

 

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The first look into the Sniper shows just how it is packed for shipping. The wiring and hardware box are securely strapped in place and don't move about during shipping. The mouse pad, however, was just placed inside, and gets a free ride during shipping. There were no issues with damage; I personally don't like things "free riding" loose inside of a case.

 

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Pulling out all the hardware, gifts and the paper riser template, there is a good unimpeded view of what you get. The inside of the Sniper uses the same frame and design as the HAF I linked to earlier, but it does add a couple of things. Of course, the obvious painting of the interior is a step in the right direction, and the additional 120mm fan clips and dust cover in the floor is another. The rest of the features include the screw-less hard drive trays and the push button optical drive locks we have seen in the HAF. I do like this interior a bunch more in black than my HAF's plain, exposed metal.

 

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All five of the optical drive bays are tool-less if you want, but the back side needs the use of screws if you want to be sure the drive is "secured". Below are the five slide-out trays for hard drives. Just release the left side latch, gently move it to the right and slide out the tray; simple really. Just in front of the hard drive bays is where the 200mm front intake fan is placed. As you can see, the sides of the rack assembly is as open as possible to allow the air an easy time through the rack.

 

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The rear of the chassis houses the 120mm exhaust fan that is powered with a 3-pin connection and does not have LED's or a connection to the fan speed controller. Just below it the seven expansion slots that utilize a plastic, tool-less retainer to hold the cards in place, something the HAF lacked. If you remember reading my Storm Sentinel Advanced review, you would have seen this mouse wire retention bracket in the extra slot to the left. At the very bottom, under the PSU, there are bumps that have been rubber padded to support the fan grill on the PSU when you install it fan down; this keeps noises and vibrations to a minimum.

 

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Looking at things from the back, you can see plenty of "room for idea" on where and how to hide the wiring and make this chassis look as sleek with components as it does without them. All the wires start in a good place on the side of the drive racks, but keep in mind there are quite a few wires for the front I/O, plus all the fan controller wiring to contend with here.

 

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Splaying out all the wires, you can see there is quite a few to connect. Two USB 2.0, a 1394, HD and AC97 Audio, and an e-SATA connection cover the left half. At the top in the middle is some of the fan power wiring , leaving the power, reset, HDD activity and power LED connections to hook up.

 

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After removing six little screws from the back side of the panel, the entire panel pulls free. The bay covers are just held in with tabs and are easily removed. The fan filter half of the bottom will pull free for cleaning out of the box, but in order to load the optical drive this cover needs to come free.

 

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Laying the Sniper on its back, you can see the supportive feet that turn out to help stabilize the chassis if there is a lot of shaking going on. I suggest they be spun out farther away from you. There is the last of the 200mm fans. As with the other two, it also attaches to the controller for both lighting and speed control.

 

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