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Team PC3-12800 Xtreem LV 4GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit - Final Thoughts

While for the most part we see 2000MHz+ DDR kits nowadays, Team has come in with a PC3-12800 kit that offers some very low timings.

| DDR-3 Memory in RAM | Posted: Dec 15, 2009 10:04 am
TweakTown Rating: 90%      Manufacturer: Team Group Inc

Final Thoughts

 

Team has put together a really nice set of modules here. Not only does the quality of the heatsink feel absolutely top notch, there was some serious overclocking potential when we relaxed the timings.

 

What you might find yourself wondering, though, is what kind of user is going to want to buy PC3-12800 stuff? Well, if you're not looking at doing a whole lot of overclocking in the CPU and memory department, you're going to want to get the most aggressively timed modules possible.

 

With a 6-7-6-18 setup there's not a whole lot to complain about. While we could say that it's a bit of a pain that the company opted for a 2T command rate, we simply changed that in the BIOS to 1T and didn't adjust any other settings including the voltages and had absolutely no issue with the modules running.

 

The most important feature when it comes to memory is the MHz available on the modules. This is going to ultimately help determine your overclock a lot more than anything else. While there are so many dividers available these days, you still want to try and have the highest MHz possible when it comes to memory speeds. The good news is that if you eventually get the bug to start upping the memory MHz more, there seems to be some headroom here.

 

This is a great option for people who think they might overclock more a bit later down the track. For now you can have some aggressively timed 1600MHz DDR modules and later on you can relax the timings and start heading north. If you really catch the bug, you could then have a look at some higher MHz modules at default that are going to offer more aggressive timings.

 

Getting a hold of the kit in a country that sells Team memory isn't going to be a problem. The only thing that might be a problem is the price. Low latency memory tends to carry with it a higher cost and for less you're able to get 1866MHz or 2000MHz kits that carry with them much more relaxed timings. Value is ultimately going to come down to the user. If you want aggressive timings you're going to pay for it; the more aggressive timings also seem to mean that if we relax them we can get some serious MHz.

 

We've got a fantastic kit of memory here. Now you just need to decide if you want aggressively timed modules or something cheaper and more relaxed and maybe faster in the MHz department.

 

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