TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,135 Reviews & Articles | 39,414 News Posts

XClio Godspeed One Advanced Mid Tower Case - Inside The XClio Godspeed One Advanced Mid Tower Case

XClio aren't one of the dominating mobs around when it comes to PC chassis' but have proven that they know how to offer great bang for your buck.

| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Nov 12, 2009 3:21 am
TweakTown Rating: 87%Manufacturer: XClio

Inside The XClio Godspeed One Advanced Mid Tower Case

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_11.jpg

 

Since I needed to remove this panel to see inside the chassis, I figured now is a good time to show off the back side. The twin 180mm fans are secured to a piece of clear plastic, mounted to the door. The inset image at the top is the connector that is found at the end of the wiring. There is the other half of this connection that is wired to the controller in the expansion slots.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_12.jpg

 

The first thing I notice is the fully tool-less bay system; this should help speed up the installation process. Tied to the bays is the hardware bag I will dump out and show off later. The front I/O wiring is tied pretty securely and partially blocks the view of the motherboard tray. There are no wire management holes, nor are there the typical front intake and rear exhaust fan combination. If you would like air to flow in that fashion, plan ahead, as you need to purchase them separately.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_13.jpg

 

Both the front and back of the racks use the screw-less mounting. If you look closely, you can see the vented area in the door panel. This should be able to provide good cooling, passively to the hard drives. Speaking of which, be sure to install the 3.5" drives before the motherboard, there isn't a ton of extra room in here to fit them in later.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_14.jpg

 

Inside of the rear panel is what we would expect to find except for two things. One being the lack of an exhaust fan, however, there is space to mount your own. The second is that XClio has equipped the chassis with a power, lighting, and speed control of the door fans that are plugged into the connection sitting on the floor of the chassis.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_15.jpg

 

Case wiring from the front I/O has good length and there was no issue getting them where they needed to connect to my motherboard. There is a Molex connector for the fan controller at the rear, an eSATA lead, USB 2.0, and audio connections. To control the motherboard and power LEDs, there is the power switch, reset switch, LED, HDD activity, and a speaker connector.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_16.jpg

 

With the rear door panel removed we gain better access to the installation process. The motherboard tray, as I said, has no accommodations for either wiring or CPU cooler access. There is sufficient room to hide wiring next to the racks, and still close the door.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_17.jpg

 

Like I promised, I wanted to show the dual 80mm fans that blow air up and out through the shroud on top of the chassis. On the opposing end, we see XClio doesn't place the feet in the chassis. This is fine as they go in very easily, and allow for the addition of casters or something similar without having to remove the feet.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_18.jpg

 

Removing the front panel was sort of a pain to do; even squeezing the tabs on the inside, the front just didn't want to let loose easily. After some persuasion and patience, here is what I found. The inside of the drive covers and the bottom intake area are backed with thin foam dust filters. The five bay covers simply remove by releasing the tabs on the inside and pushing the cover out of the frame.

 

TweakTown image content/3/0/3006_19.jpg

 

Behind the front panel is a not very well ventilated panel. While XClio does provide room for the intake fan, it isn't what I would call an "air flow friendly" drill pattern. The bays are also blocked off, but these bits of steel can be easily twisted and removed to allow the drive bays to "breathe".

 

Related Tags

Further Reading: Read and find more Cases, Cooling & PSU content at our Cases, Cooling & PSU reviews, guides and articles index page.

Do you get our RSS feed? Get It!

Got an opinion on this content? Post a comment below!

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases