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NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case - The Build

All aluminium welded contruction,300 CFM of airflow and a sleek compact design all add up to Chad's newest sample, the NZXT Panzerbox ATX chassis.

| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: May 8, 2009 5:13 am
TweakTown Rating: 92%Manufacturer: NZXT

The Build

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

As I mentioned, there are only six risers supplied in the Panzerbox, at least in mine. This leads to a bit of an issue. The case claims ATX support, and I can see the holes are drilled and threaded for ATX, but with only six risers they leave me wondering why.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Anyways, on with the show! Even with only the six risers in place I continued on with the build. Here we have the motherboard all ready to be slid into place inside the Panzerbox. While the heatpipes on my passive video card wouldn't allow tray to install, I added it just to complete the look.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

I wanted to give potential buyers a good look at just how much room there is to pre-install your cooler to the motherboard, then install the unit onto the tray. My measurement shows just over 6/5" from the PCB surface, not the top of the IHS. Six inches of room is fair enough to get most tower coolers in place and still allow clearance to install it as one piece.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Installed the optical and HDD, now to slide in the tray, and start getting things wired up and ready to go. I did run into an issue with my choice of slots, which I will show why and address in a few images.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Sliding the motherboard tray back into place is a breeze, especially with a stock cooler in place. Just line up the top and bottom tracks and gently push inward. Don't forget to tuck that fan wire before you get the tray all the way in.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Once the tray is all the way in, just screw in the five, plastic coated thumb screws to lock it into place.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Here is the issue I ran into. No that isn't a full view of the 24-pin power plug it is the reflection of half of the plug on the back of the DVD drive. With a full ATX board, this is something that needs to be considered when building inside the Panzerbox. This situation was easily remedied but raising both drives one slot, then they will flank the 24-pin above and below it.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

I took a step back to show just how well everything goes together once you get past the small setbacks, that weren't accounted for. I did a bit of basic wire management, and as you can see the drives are now moved to allow access to the 24-pin socket. I didn't like the front power wires running across this side, and as you can see they did make it over the top of the cage and still were long enough to be connected on my ATX motherboard.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

You can see the Panzerbox doesn't offer anything in the way of wire ties or specific spots to tie wires to. This doesn't really cause any issues, though, as a few zip ties here and there work wonders for keeping the wires tamed and out of the way of the airflow.

 

NZXT Panzerbox All Aluminum Mid Tower Case

(Click the above image for the large version)

 

Here we have the last of the build shots. The power supply eventually gets mounted right in front of the graphics card. The instructions show that the PSU should be installed fan in, I'm guessing to help draw heat off of the card and utilize the PSU as another exhaust fan for the case. I chose to flip it this way for two reasons. One, being the wires are closer to the floor for display purposes. There isn't much to do to hide all these wires, you can tuck them behind the PSU on the floor and even a few can slide underneath it, but I chose to just lay them in the open. I have good reasons for leaving them lay there. First, no rat's nets of wires behind the PSU and two, they are out of the way of the airflow and with a full panel door, who is going to see them?

 

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