TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
5,979 Reviews & Articles | 38,635 News Posts

Coolink U1P2 HSF Review - U1P2 HSF - Page 2

Not too many people have heard of a company by the name of Coolink, but that may change in the very near future. This company is creating some new heatsinks that aim at the overclocking crowd, but can they succeed? Come join Mike "Darthtanion" Wright as he takes a look at one of this fledgling company's coolers; namely the U1P2 HSF. Its a strange name for a strange looking cooler, but the bottom line is results, and you may just have to take a second look when you see how it performs.

| CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Apr 1, 2002 5:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 9.0%      Manufacturer: Coolink

The Sink

 

 

I've seen some pretty wild looking coolers before, but the sink on this one ranks pretty high on the out of the ordinary list. The heatsink itself is made of aluminum and has 24 fins that go through the entire unit. Not only that, but the fins are of varied height too. We'll have to see in a bit whether this idea works when it comes to keeping the processor cool.

 

One of the first things that you notice when taking in this sink is the brute size of it. This isn't a little toy, but a monstrous chunk of metal that is large enough to fit two full sized 60mm fans. So how big is it? How about a whopping 67mm x 120mm x 44mm (without fans). Talk about a behemoth!

 

But with all that girth, will it mount on a motherboard without getting in the way of all those capacitors around the socket? The answer is YES. Here's why…

 

 

Notice the raised area that is on both sides of the processor? This is a full 25mm above the base of the sink. This will give you plenty of room to clear even the largest of capacitors. In my case, it even sat comfortably above the fan that covers the Northbridge of the mainboard. What this means to you is that you should have no problems with the size of the heatsink unless you have items close to the socket that stand over 25mm above the level of the processor's core.

 

The Base

 

 

The base of the sink is a copper plate that is adhered to the aluminum sink itself. The lines you see in the picture above are the machining marks from where Coolink has planed the base flat. Though it may not look it, the base was quite smooth. For those who are into polishing the base, a quick attack with some emery cloth and a bit of polish will have you shinier than a new penny.

 

 

The picture above shows the copper base as it is attached to the aluminum heatsink. Since there are no pins visible in the base, this leads me to believe that the copper plate is simply glued onto the sink. We'll have to see how well it can hold up to the pressures of cooling with a setup like this.

 

The Fans

 

 

WOW...what have we here? We already knew that this was a twin fan model, but those fans hide a very nice surprise underneath. They're YS Tech fans! This is a very nice thing indeed. YS Tech has a reputation of putting out some of the best fans on the market, and they tend to be just a bit quieter than the Delta models. These fans also have the standard 4-pin Molex connector for power, and a separate 3-pin connector for the monitoring of fan speeds through BIOS and software.

 

Now that we're over the pleasant discovery of the branded fans, let's take a quick look at what we have here. The fans included with U1P2 cooler are 60mm x 60mm x 25mm, spin at approx. 7,000-RPM and have an impressive 40-CFM airflow each. Of course, the fact that we have twin monsters means that we will also have a louder overall sound level. Can the cooling potential overcome the noise level? We'll be answering that question in a little bit when we start the testing.

 

The Clipping Mechanism

 

 

Though there is nothing outrageously fancy about the clip on this unit, it does use all six lugs on the socket. This has come to be a blessing for those who have accidentally broken the center lug of their socket. And even if you haven't had the misfortune of breaking off a lug, it still makes the heatsink sit more firmly atop the processor.

 

Though the clip didn't require a lot of pressure to mount, it did take just a little adjustment to get it seated correctly on the core. There is a good bit of wiggle room between the clip and the sink, so when you get the back set of lugs hooked in, make sure that you move the heatsink back toward it before attaching the front of the clip. This will ensure that the heatsink is in full contact with the processor core.

 

Other than this, the clip attached the sink with no problems. It didn't take a huge amount of pressure to get it set onto the lugs, and the slot was just right for setting a flat bladed screwdriver in and putting it over the front lugs. If only all clips were this easy to install.

 

Further Reading: Read and find more Cases, Cooling & PSU content at our Cases, Cooling & PSU reviews, guides and articles index page.

Do you get our RSS feed? Get It!

Post a Comment about this content

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts
Check out TweakTown Polls on LockerDome on LockerDome

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases