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Dr. Thermal TI-V77N HSF Review - TI-V77N - Page 3

Remember a little while back when we raved at the retention system of the Dr. Thermal TI-V86N HSF? Well there's another model running around, and this time it features a larger footprint and fan to help in those cooling chores. So come join Mike "Darthtanion" Wright as he takes a closer look at the Dr. Thermal TI-V77N HSF. It's time to see if it has what it takes to be a part of your overclocked system.

| CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jan 30, 2002 5:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 8.5%Manufacturer: Thermal Integration Technology, Inc.

Testing

 

Now that we have all the technical stuff out of the way, it's time to get down to some hardcore numbers. After all, we buy a heatsink for the cooling potential, don't we? Here's what the test system consists of:

 

Antec SX1030 Tower Case w/ 170-CFM airflow

 

EPoX 8KHA+ Motherboard

 

AMD Thunderbird 1000MHz Processor @ 1400MHz (AVIA)

 

512MB Crucial PC2100 DDR Memory

 

Prolink XX-Player GeForce3

 

IBM GXP60 40GB Hard Drive

 

Arctic Silver II

 

The core voltage of the processor is set to 1.8v, and memory is set to 2.6v. Ambient air temperature was sitting at 21.6C (about 71F) and didn't fluctuate during testing. Processor speed was firmly at 1400MHz, which puts out about 76.8 watts of heat.

 

Testing will consist of measuring the temperatures at idle, after a Quake III Arena Deathmatch, and after a continuous looping of the 3dMark2001 Demo. These are the main types of stresses that today's systems face, so we'll concentrate on them.

 

- Idle (Celsius)

 

 

- Quake III Arena (Celsius)

 

 

- 3dMark2001 Demo Loop (Celsius)

 

 

I was a bit surprised to see that the V77 series heatsinks were outperformed by their little brother (the V86 series), but it still managed to show a very respectable result. The OCZ Gladiator had been reigning champion for some time, and the TI-V77N was still able to come in a bit ahead of that standard. So what it all boils down to is the fact that this heatsink manages to be competitive when it comes to outright cooling power.

 

Something else of note is the fact that the sound of this cooler doesn't force you out of the room. While you can hear the fan, it's not overpowering, nor is it the ear-piercing scream of the Delta units. It is a very tolerable noise and doesn't hinder you while working or gaming.

 

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