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Zalman TRIMON 22" 3D Monitor - Exclusive - 3D in more Detail

Zalman has joined the LCD market with an interesting approach. We take an exclusive look at their '3D' capable ZM-M220W.

| Monitors in Displays & Projectors | Posted: Apr 16, 2008 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 90%Manufacturer: Zalman

3D in more Detail

 

While I am unable to simulate stereoscopic vision with my camera, I was able to show a difference by holding the polarized lens so that I took the picture through it. If you look at the expanded image, you may be able to just make out the banded polarized aspect of the lens, which covered the frame in the snapshot.

 

The TRIMON achieves its stereoscopic effect by working in tandem with a special polarised filtered screen. The light that the TFT monitor emits is polarised through the two polarizing filters on the surface of the monitor itself. The glasses that you have to wear to see the 3D effect are also polarised and allow only the aligned light from the monitor that correlates through to your eyes.

 

 

Thus giving each eye a slightly different perspective, and allowing your brain to interpret the rest. This kind of stereoscopic 3D tunnelling is then interpreted as a 3D image. In the past you may have used the anaglyphic glasses (one red lens (L), one cyan lens (R)) but these tended to wash out colour aspects. The TRIMON does not dilute the colour in any way, so you see true 3D adaptations of a 2D image in true 32-bit colour depth.

 

I took some pictures with the camera, and then put the 3D lens from the glasses as a filter. You can judge for yourself it there is a difference. Please remember that the camera does not have stereoscopic vision, so it is simply the polarised image for only one eye that we are seeing in the second picture. Our brain would see two slightly different images and thus build the "3D" reality that it perceives.

 

This is without the 3D polarized lens:

 

 

This is with the 3D polarized lens:

 

 

Games are affected in much the same way. Each optimized game has a pre-defined profile to enhance your 3D experience. You may also refine the experience by modifying the profile to your needs. Please remember to do the associated test that NVIDIA include in their 3D driver package that measures if you can indeed experience the 3D enhancements. Fortunately, I was able to pass the test and so began my foray into gaming wonders never before experienced.

 

These are some pictures I took of a scenic view in the game called Crysis. Again, I have included a picture without the lens and the second picture with the polarized lens. In this instance it is a little more apparent that the lens filters out parts of the full picture. With the brain getting the rest of the picture from the other eye, it then warps the image into a 3D image that is extremely intense on the nerves, as if Crysis wasn't intense enough without this added realism.

 

This is without the 3D polarized lens:

 

 

This is with the 3D polarized lens:

 

 

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