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Cooler Master Real Power Pro 1250w PSU - In The Box

Cooler Master's new badboy PSU gets a going over from us today to see if it's worthy of being in your power-hungry rig.

| Other PSUs in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jan 14, 2008 5:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 92%Manufacturer: Cooler Master

In The Box

 

 

Once you break open the packaging you will find yourself with exactly what you would expect to see with a power supply. It is not a modular design like many others hitting the streets, but that is a convenience feature and not a necessity. All cabling is wrapped in a mesh covering so managing the clutter isn't too big a chore.

 

As far as power is concerned, this model is rated at 40A for both the 3.3v and 5v rails, and has six 12v rails with three being rated at 20A and the other three being rated at 28A each. This is a huge amount of available power, so I wouldn't expect to see any stability issues even for those who have a monster system. With the rails being set up as they are, you can also expect a solid supply of power regardless if you are using a newer Intel platform or an older Athlon rig. Both the 5v and 12v rails are more than capable of handling whatever load you throw at it.

 

 

The exterior facing of the Real Power is minimal in features, but the remaining space is a huge mesh cover to allow for ample airflow. After all, if you are going to be producing this much power, you will want it to be able to remain cool inside.

 

One item of note is in regards to the cable port. You will need to make sure that you don't lose your included cable since this is not an industry standard connection. Instead, the Real Power Pro uses a heavy duty power cord and the power block has the pins facing sideways from what we have come to expect. Shown just above the port is a small LED indicator that lights when the unit is getting power from the wall outlet. This is a nice little easy-to-use troubleshooting step when diagnosing power issues. If the light is not on, you know where the problem lies without having to tear apart your entire rig.

 

 

To aid in the cooling department, there is a very large 135mm fan housed in the bottom panel of this power supply. Like most hitting the streets it includes an automatic speed control that is set to run faster at higher temperatures. While testing this model, the volume never got too loud. Even with case fans set to low speed I was not able to discern this fan over the others already running. While not a completely silent solution, it won't be a nuisance running in your performance system.

 

From this angle you can also see the mirror finish of the unit. It has a very nice sheen and will set off nicely in those enclosures with a large side window. There are no lighting effects in the fan, so those who are already set with a colored lighting scheme in their current chassis will not have to worry about contrasting colors clashing in the window.

 

 

As noted above, this is not a modular design, but everything is still kept nice and neat. There is a plastic grommet that surrounds the harness port coming from the internals of this power supply to keep your cables from getting cut or damaged during use. As soon as they exit the unit, they are secured with a zip tie then protected even more with a mesh covering. Overall it has a neat and very clean appearance.

 

 

With this much power one would expect to have a lot of compatibility and the Cooler Master Real Power Pro 1250 doesn't let us down. Primary connectors consist of a 24-pin main and both an 8-pin and a 4-pin for auxiliary power requirements. For components you have seven Molex, two FDD, eight SATA, six standard PCI-E and three PCI-E8 cables. This should handle the needs of just about every power-hungry system out there with room to spare.

 

Take note that the primary coupler is strictly as 24-pin and not the older 20+4 variety. This means that you will need an adapter if you are still using a mainboard needing the 20-pin primary. Most of us have already upgraded to the newer revision boards, but for those who haven't, prepare in advance. Power is more than adequate to handle pretty much anything, but make sure your motherboard can utilize the 24-pin header.

 

Further Reading: Read and find more Cases, Cooling & PSU content at our Cases, Cooling & PSU reviews, guides and articles index page.

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