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Thermaltake Active Memory Cooling Kit Review - Thermaltake Active Memory Cooling Kit - Page 2

For those looking into ways to get more out of their systems, cooling the memory has become a new goal. Darthtanion takes a look at the Thermaltake Active Memory Cooling Kit and let's you know whether it can accomplish this task. After all, a cooler system is a happy system... and one that is potentially faster then ever before.

| Cables & Accessories in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Oct 22, 2001 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 9.0%Manufacturer: Thermaltake

What you get...

 

 

The kit comes with everything needed to get right to work. You get the Heat Spreaders (one of which has the fan assembly attached), two strips of frag tape, two clips for attaching the spreaders, and a handy 3-pin to 4-pin converter for those who don't have a free fan header available on their motherboard.

 

The Fan

 

 

 

The fan itself is a very small 12v fan made by Everflow. It measures in at 40mm x 40mm x 20mm, spins at 5,000 RPM and puts out about 5-CFM of airflow power. Sound output is a lowly 23 dBA, so will probably not even be heard over the sound of a normal heatsink fan. It also draws well under 1.5 watts of power, so should cause no problems with overloading the system PSU.

 

One thing I didn't care for was the fact that the fan is using a sleeve bearing instead of ball bearings. This will both shorten the lifespan of the fan, and also make for a less efficient fan assembly overall. I think, though, that Thermaltake was aiming for low cost in this area, so it is understandable. I have seen the kit selling for only US$10 online, so it managed to succeed in that area.

 

Though there isn't much airflow being created, what there is manages to be very effectively placed to the required area. This is accomplished by the fins on the bottom side of the fan assembly. The airflow is blown directly to where its needed; namely onto the heat spreaders where it can get rid of the heat that is produced by the memory modules.

 

Installation

 

 

Installation is pretty straightforward. You take the heat spreaders and attach them to the memory module, then use the two clips to keep everything firmly in place. Install the memory module back into the system and you're set. Plug it into a power source and you have yourself some active cooling for your memory modules.

 

The photo above shows the unit in place on an Abit KT7A-RAID motherboard. There were no problems at all with the installation, and the power cord for the fan was easily long enough to be attached to the #2 fan header on the motherboard. I was a bit concerned that the airflow might interfere with the fan on the Northbridge, but that proved to be no problem. Since the amount of air was relatively small, it didn't get in the way of the chipset fan.

 

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