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Wearable Computing Posts - Page 4

Leap Motion partners with Razer, will be baked into the OSVR headset

Leap Motion has teamed up with Razer for its OSVR headsets, where it will supply its motion-tracking technology directly into the Open Source Virtual Reality headset.

 

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Razer's upcoming Hacker Development Kit (HDK) headset for OSVR will be made available later this year, where developers will have the option of buying one with the faceplate that feature's Leap Motion's gesture-tracking hardware and software baked inside. Developers who opt for this will receive a bundle that includes the ability to create apps and experiences that will use Leap Motion's hand-tracking technology.

 

Leap Motion's CEO, Michael Buckwald, has said that this partnership is just the first it will have with VR headset makers. Buckwald was coy on which other partners it is working with, but teased that Leap Motion's long-term goal is to have their technology in as many of the leading VR headsets as possible. Buckwald said: "The peripheral [the Leap Motion controller as a standalone device] is still our biggest business but VR is our priority now. We can be in at the ground floor and help shape what it means to have input and help shape what the [VR] operating systems look like".

Continue reading 'Leap Motion partners with Razer, will be baked into the OSVR headset' (full post)

Best Buy will sell the Samsung Gear VR starting this Friday

Samsung, Oculus VR and Best Buy have partnered together to get the Galaxy Note 4-powered Gear VR headset on Best Buy shelves on March 27 - or this Friday - for $199.

 

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The Gear VR headsets will be at 100 of Best Buy's stores, with more stores receiving the VR headset later this year. The Gear VR Innovator Edition is powered by Samsung's own Galaxy Note 4 smartphone, which features a 5.7-inch 2560x1440 display that provides an immersive VR experience on-the-go.

Wearables spending increasing, but privacy, security concerns linger

The fitness and healthcare sectors will help drive the wearables market into an estimated $2 billion market by 2019, according to Juniper Research, but questions remain.

 

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There is great potential for doctors and medical patients embracing wearable devices able to consistently monitor physical data - but privacy concerns and unstable regulation must be addressed. Medical devices have mandated standards they must follow while collecting and storing data, though wearables don't currently follow the same standards.

 

In its "Smart Wireless Devices: CE, Enterprise, Fitness, Healthcare, Patients, 2015-2019", Juniper Research also found a use for smart glasses and other wearables in the workplace.

Continue reading 'Wearables spending increasing, but privacy, security concerns linger' (full post)

Sports can benefit from wearables, help drive interest

Wearable manufacturers can pitch their products to a wide possible customer base, but attracting athletes could be of major focus in the future.

 

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Many endurance athletes already rely on heart rate monitors and GPS units, but companies hope devices that are able to track additional metrics, such as skin temperature and respiration, are appealing. The hardware is important, but companies must create appealing partnerships so that all collected data can be easily observed by active consumers.

 

Instead of trying to create a product to compete with trusted GPS units, wearable manufacturers may try to make clothing, shoes, sunglasses, and other athletic gear smarter.

Continue reading 'Sports can benefit from wearables, help drive interest' (full post)

Fitbit CEO: Don't worry about wearables causing cancer to wearers

Fitbit CEO James Park doesn't buy into long-term health care concerns over smartwatches and other wearables, despite a recent New York Times story.

 

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The story noted that similar to smartphones, wearables could be linked to cancer, due to radiation being emitted - but Park and others believe this type of research needs to be more carefully examined.

 

"In general, cell phones are definitely a very different beast than the low powered wearables," Park said in a statement to TIME. "The transmit energies are orders of magnitude higher. So if people are comfortable wearing Bluetooth headsets, I think wearables are even less of a concern because Bluetooth headsets are also close to your head. Wearables are not, unless you happen to sleep right on top of your wrists."

Continue reading 'Fitbit CEO: Don't worry about wearables causing cancer to wearers' (full post)

Intel investing in the mobile market, researching possible moves

Intel is currently undergoing its largest push into the mobile market, learning from previous mistakes after missing the first major smartphone wave a few years ago. The company has endured dropping sales of PCs and laptops, as more consumers and business workers embrace mobile - so this is an important effort for the Silicon Valley giant.

 

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"They're determined not to miss the next big thing," said Mark Hung, analyst at Gartner. As such, Intel's Q1 revenue estimate lost almost $1 billion because of slowing PC sales, but merged its mobile and PC businesses into one computing business.

 

"It helps when your other businesses are performing well," said Andy Bryant, Intel board Chairman, in a statement to investors late last year. "When things are going well it gives you the time and the resolve to make the changes you need to make in other parks of your business."

Magic Leap teases the next generation of augmented office warfare

When Google invested a huge $500 million into Magic Leap last year, we didn't know what would come of that - until, well, now. Take a look at the video below, and if you're not impressed, I would be heavily surprised.

 

 

The company has stated that this is a real game that the Magic Leap staff play in their offices right now, and I want to, too. It looks so good that it looks like it is something that was created as a technology demo, and isn't real right now, but with the Google-funded company promising that this is indeed real, the potential of this is quite large.

 

I don't think what we're seeing right here is possible with the technology we have right now, as the wearable side of things for the user would require a serious shrink from the size we have today. But, it is a great tease and a peep into the future, which is exciting nonetheless.

Continue reading 'Magic Leap teases the next generation of augmented office warfare' (full post)

Doctors show some health concern related to wearable devices

The wearable electronics market is booming, and some consumers and doctors are wondering what type of health impact these products could have on owners.

 

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Considering the Apple Watch - which is expected to quickly propel the wearables market - isn't even out yet, and there has been no research into possible health-related issues, this is more of a general concern than outright risk.

 

"The radiation really comes from the 3G connection on a cell phone, so devices like the Jawbone Up and Apple Watch should be okay," said Dr. Joseph Mercola, alternative medicine specialist, in a statement to the New York Times. "But if you're buying a watch with a cellular chip built in, then you've got a cell phone attached to your wrist."

Continue reading 'Doctors show some health concern related to wearable devices' (full post)

Fitbit: Wearables show great potential in the health industry

Fitness wearables and smartwatches might be popular among consumers, but show true potential in the health industry. The collected data could be easily passed from consumer directly to his or her medical professional, offering a more detailed look into daily physical activity.

 

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There are concerns related to privacy and data security, especially when it comes to personal medical information, though Fitbit - and other manufacturers - are keen to work with the FDA to approve regulation.

 

"I think right now everyone is focused on pure consumer benefits and motivating people to change their behavior," said James Park, CEO of Fitbit, in an interview with TIME. "I think there'll be a next big leap in benefits once we tie into more detailed clinical research and cross hurdles and dialogue with the FDA about what we can do for consumers and what's regulated or not."

Continue reading 'Fitbit: Wearables show great potential in the health industry' (full post)

Augmented reality finding a place on the production floor

Smart glasses using augmented reality may not have taken off among consumers, but are still going strong in the workplace. A growing number of Fortune 500 companies are testing augmented reality, hoping the budding technology will help employees be more productive.

 

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"It's combining the digital world and the physical world," said Tuong Nguyen, principal research analyst at Gartner, in a statement to NBC New. "There are a lot of companies that are trying this technology out."

 

There is great potential for AR to be used with business leaders trying to promote the "deskless workforce," with many employees deployed out in the field. Access to hands-free, real-time data gives them increased advantage to make things happen while no longer waiting for paperwork.

Continue reading 'Augmented reality finding a place on the production floor' (full post)

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