Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,576 Reviews & Articles | 44,595 News Posts
TRENDING NOW: Microsoft reportedly interested in acquiring AMD

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 9

Graffiti 'artist' uses drone to tag massive Kendall Jenner ad in SOHO

Drones are being used for a lot of new and innovative purposes, and a few rather questionable activities. It looks like drone graffiti could be a future trend, with a tagger taking aim at a billboard featuring a Kendall Jenner ad.

 

 

"KATSU" used a drone with a can of red spray paint attached to the side, successfully vandalizing the billboard in SOHO, between Houston and Lafayette streets. He had this to say about graffiti drone 1.0, when speaking with WIRED: "It turned out surprisingly well. It's exciting to see its first potential use as a device for vandalism."

 

Graffiti removal is a costly effort in metropolitan areas, so this certainly could push the boundaries even further. It may take some time for KATSU and other taggers to develop a stable platform for drone graffiti, but it certainly may end up a major headache for a lot of people.

Continue reading 'Graffiti 'artist' uses drone to tag massive Kendall Jenner ad in SOHO' (full post)

Researchers create ape-inspired robot that could explore the moon

National space programs have shown new interest in lunar exploration, and it's possible robots could roam the moon's surface. The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) has created an iStruct Demonstrator, also known as "Charlie," a robotic ape that can you different locomotion styles.

 

 

Using four-legged locomotion adds stability, but bipedal is best for speed and ability to maneuver - so having the robot be able to choose how to move is absolutely huge.

 

"We chose the ape because it allows us to study several locomotion modes," said Daniel Kuhn, DFKI researcher, in a statement to CNN. "For example, they have quite good quadrupedal walking abilities but they can also perform stand-up motion and walk on two legs - their ability to do this is greater than other animals. This change in posture and walking form interested us."

Continue reading 'Researchers create ape-inspired robot that could explore the moon' (full post)

Russian military said to be developing mind-controlled exoskeleton

Military technology has become absolutely fascinating in the past few years, with autonomous drones, robots, smart technology, and exoskeletons advancing nicely.

 

russian-military-developing-mind-controlled-exoskeleton_01

 

The Russian military is reportedly developing mind-controlled exoskeletons, multiple Russian news outlets claim. If there is any truth to the reports, soldiers could carry up to 600 pounds of additional weight. What makes this announcement curious is the idea that Russia is five years away from being able to include a neuroelectronic interface so the suit's wearer has a unique controlling mechanism.

 

"The Russian Army is set to receive mind-controlled exoskeletons," the Russian Sputnik media source said. "The wearable robots will be controlled by brain waves and will increase the strength and endurance of the serviceman wearing it by several times."

Continue reading 'Russian military said to be developing mind-controlled exoskeleton' (full post)

Robots in UCSF hospital utilize 'virtual railroad' to get the job done

The 'Eve' robot is being utilized at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center at Mission Bay, a new facility that opened in February. The robots can help humans, make test sample deliveries, and ensure each room has supplies as needed.

 

 

UCSF purchased 25 robots from Aethon for $3.5 million, and then invested an additional $2.5 million to prepare the robots and hospital. The hospital expects to break even within two years on its robotic investment, while also freeing up staff to conduct other tasks.

 

"The hospital is set up almost as a virtual railroad... if they encounter an obstacle along the way, that's when they use their various sensors, laser, sonar and infrared to navigate around those items and continue on their path," said Brian Herriot, director of Mission Bay operations planning for the UCSF Medical Center, in a statement published by NBC News.

Continue reading 'Robots in UCSF hospital utilize 'virtual railroad' to get the job done' (full post)

Tesla unveils Powerwall, an Internet-connected battery for your house

After quite a while of teasing, Tesla has unveiled its home battery: Powerwall. Tesla's new Powerwall home battery system allows people to disconnect from the power grid for a few hours, which isn't perfect, but it will have significant power savings for countless people around the world.

 

tesla-unveils-powerwall-internet-connected-battery-house_07

 

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that the new Powerwall is a "whole integrated system that just works and is connected to the Internet". Powerwall is packed with lithium-ion cells and a liquid thermal-control system, with Powerwall being tested with specific customers for the past year. The home battery connects to the Internet so that it can track power usage and share the information with utilities.

 

How much will Tesla's Powerwall set you back? Right now, the 10kWh system is offered to installers for $3500, while the 7kWh will cost people $3000. These two systems do not include the cost of a DC-to-AC inverter, but if you've already got solar panels, you won't need that additional DC-to-AC inverter. Distributors can lease the Powerwall to consumers, with the Tesla-made device including a 10-year guaranteed life with warranty, and will begin shipping in late summer.

Continue reading 'Tesla unveils Powerwall, an Internet-connected battery for your house' (full post)

Study: One-third of children use a touchscreen by age one

More than one-third of babies are interacting with touchscreen tablets and smartphones before they are able to crawl, walk and talk. Specifically, 36 percent of children have experience with touching or scrolling before age one, with 15 percent using apps by the same age, according to the Einstein Medical Center's pediatrics department.

 

study-one-third-children-use-touchscreen-age_01

 

Mobile technology becomes more common place, and while there are plenty of educational apps available, researchers are most concerned about children from zero-to-two years old. It's a critical time for brain development, in which human interaction is absolutely vital.

 

"On the one hand, we have lots of experience with television, and we know that it has some pitfalls and some dangers for children in terms of their educational learning," said Laura Jana, an Omaha-based pediatrician, in a statement to CBS News. "Some benefits as well. Mobile devices, when we're talking about screens and things, are so new that this is a really important survey that has given us some initial information about just how prevalent the use is in very young ages."

Continue reading 'Study: One-third of children use a touchscreen by age one' (full post)

Audi researchers create liquid 'e-diesel' out of water and air

Audi has created high-quality liquid "e-diesel," a synthetic diesel mainly made of water and CO2, according to the German automaker.

 

audi-researchers-create-liquid-e-diesel-water-air_01

 

Researchers first heat steam so it is broken down into hydrogen and oxygen, at temperatures above 1,472 Fahrenheit, and then mix the hydrogen with carbon dioxide. The result is a blue crude, something similar to crude oil, which is then refined into e-diesel. Unlike traditional diesel fuel, there is no sulfur or aromatic hydrocarbons which are bad for the environment.

 

"If we can make widespread use of CO2 as a raw material, we will make a crucial contribution to climate protection and the efficient use of resources, and put the fundamentals of the green economy in place," said Johanna Wanka, German Education and Research minister, during a press conference.

Continue reading 'Audi researchers create liquid 'e-diesel' out of water and air' (full post)

'Space Spider' 3D scanner could be used on space station

Artec 3D hopes that its "Space Spider" 3D scanner will one day have a presence in space, possibly aboard the International Space Station.

 

space-spider-3d-scanner-used-station_01

 

The Space Spider's advanced cooling system has been designed to prevent the handheld scanner from overheating, making it an ideal solution while in microgravity. It's not uncommon to hear that electronics in orbit overheat and malfunction, with NASA and other space agencies asking companies to find solutions to prevent these types of issues.

 

"Imagine the potential of using 3D scanning technology on the International Space Station paired with a 3D printer," said Artyom Yuhkin, president and CEO of Artec 3D. "The Space Spider boasts an enhanced cooling system that allows the user to capture accurate 3D data more rapidly. This handheld scanner can endure some of the most difficult situations on Earth and has been engineered to perform in nearly zero-gravity environments when called upon."

Continue reading ''Space Spider' 3D scanner could be used on space station' (full post)

Stanford researchers create robot able to drag 2,000 times its weight

Researchers from Stanford University will demonstrate a unique tiny robot that is able to drag an object up to 2,000 times heavier than itself. The "MicroTug" robots were inspired by the anatomical design of geckos and ants, which are able to carry large amounts of weight - and travel in unique manners.

 

stanford-researchers-create-robot-lift-2-000-times-weight_01

 

A separate robot is able to carry up to 100 times its body weight, using feet with tiny rubber spikes that can physically bend under pressure.

 

The actual design of the robots is simple, with a processor, motor, battery, wheels, adhesive layer and winch used to make up the powerful MicroTugs.

Continue reading 'Stanford researchers create robot able to drag 2,000 times its weight' (full post)

Researchers create 3D printed medical implant that changes shape

US medical researchers have created a 3D printed medical device that is able to change shape and help improve breathing as a child grows. Researchers believe the device worked better than they originally imagined, and look forward to a future clinical trial.

 

researchers-create-3d-printed-medical-implant-changes-shape_01

 

The custom biomaterial was used to treat three children suffering from tracheobronchomalacia, a medical issue when airway walls are weak, causing them to collapse after a rough cough or unusual breathing patterns. The 3D-printed splints were tubes - both hollow and porous - that can be attached over impacted airways, giving them increased strength.

 

"This is the first 3D printed implant specifically designed to change shape over time to allow for a child's growth before finally reabsorbing as the disease is cured," said Dr. Glenn Green, associate professor of pediatric otolaryngology at the University of Michigan, and contributing author for the study, in a statement published by Reuters.

Latest News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases
Subscribe to our Newsletter
Or Scroll Down