Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,580 Reviews & Articles | 44,621 News Posts

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 32

USAF hospital plans to use virus-zapping robot to kill germs

The US Air Force Hospital Langley is now using the "Saul" virus-zapping robot to try to keep hospitals safer by killing viruses, including Ebola, working with the Xenex company. The robot is able to use powerful ultraviolet light to ensure the hospital's patient and operating rooms are safe from germ pathogens that could infect others. It only takes five minutes for the robot to disinfect an entire room, with surfaces cleaned in just two minutes, according to Xenex.

 

usaf_hospital_plans_to_use_virus_zapping_robot_to_kill_germs_01

 

"We are very proud to be the first Air Force hospital to have this robot," said Col. Marlene Kerchenski, 633rd MDG Surgeon General chief of nursing services. "Saul will provide an extra measure of safety for both our patients and our intensive care unit staff."

 

Xenex has already grabbed headlines when it was announced the Gigi robot would be used in hospitals to help kill viruses, including Ebola, in hospital rooms. These pricey machines are designed to help keep hospitals a cleaner, safer environment for staff, patients, and visitors.

Google hires more experts to "accelerate" its efforts in AI research

Google is getting much more serious about artificial intelligence, with the Mountain View-based search giant hiring more than a dozen leading academics and experts in the field of AI. The company has also announced it has reached a partnership with Oxford University, to "accelerate" its efforts in AI.

 

google_hires_more_experts_to_accelerate_its_efforts_in_ai_research_04

 

When it comes to the partnership between Oxford and Google, the company will be making a "substantial contribution" in order to kick start a new research partnership with the University's computer science and engineering departments. Google's goal? To develop the intelligence of machines and software, to reach human-like levels. Google hasn't said just how much it will be contributing, but it will have a program of student intern ships and a series of joint lectures and workshops so that it can "share knowledge and expertise".

 

It was only in January that the company dumped down $400 million to acquire DeepMind, an AI firm. This new partnership with Oxford University will see a quicker, and brighter future in AI, even if Elon Musk, the founder of PayPal, SpaceX and Tesla Motors says that pioneering AI will be like "summoning the devil".

Elon Musk warns of AI again, says it's like "summoning the demon"

The last hyperbolic headline we had about Elon Musk and artificial intelligence was just a couple of months ago now when the Tesla Motors founder said that AI could be "more dangerous than nukes" and now he's back with a new statement. Musk has said that pioneering AI is like "summoning the demon".

 

elon_musk_warns_of_ai_again_says_it_s_like_summoning_the_demon_08

 

Musk had some interesting things to say during a speech at MIT on Friday, where he told an audience that the technology sector should be "very careful" of pioneering AI, calling it "our biggest existential threat". Why is Musk afraid? Multiple times during his speech, he reiterated that such a technology is a massive risk, because it can't be controlled. He ended up using the metaphor of "with artificial intelligence we are summoning the demon".

 

We've all seen AI and what it does to the human race in movies like the Terminator and The Matrix franchises, but Musk lined AI up in the real-world to a horror movie, where the protagonists call forth spirits who end up doing a lot of bad things. Musk said: "In all those stories where there's the guy with the pentagram and the holy water, it's like yeah he's sure he can control the demon. Didn't work out". Considering there's already a lot of important things that computers do for us on the daily, such as financial trading, high-end computing and countless other important jobs, AI is an eventuality.

New tech alerts dispatchers to when, and where a cop fires their gun

An incredible new technology created by a Silicon Valley startup would allow dispatchers some crucial details on when, and where police offers fire their weapons. Yardam Technologies' latest device would notify dispatchers in real-time when an officer's gun has been removed from its holster, when it was fired, and in which direction it was fired, as well as tracking the gun's location.

 

new_tech_alerts_dispatchers_to_when_and_where_a_cop_fires_their_gun_02

 

Phil Wowak, Santa Cruz County Sheriff is one of two officers testing the technology, saying it would allow the sheriff's office to see whether deputies are in trouble, and unable to ask for assistance. He said: "That's the worst nightmare for any police officer in the field". As it stands, this technology will not allow for a remote disabling mechanism, even though the company was showing off that technology in Las Vegas last year, it has since abandoned that effort.

 

In the previous iteration of the technology, it would've allowed a dispatcher, or someone else in control, to hit a button and safely disable the weapon. This would've come in handy in countless scenarios, such as when an officer drops their gun, is hit, or killed and their weapon can be used by the assailant. Jim Schaff, the Marketing Vice President of Yardarm Technologies didn't detail the reasoning behind removing the remote disabling feature, but the company has said that their latest technology is not out to create a smart gun, but is more "police gunfire tracking technology".

Google teams up with Oxford University for AI robotics research

Google has added some kick to its artificial intelligence research, hiring at least a half dozen researchers, while also partnering with Oxford University. The Silicon Valley company hopes to make Internet search intuitive by creating sub-atomic quantum chips that were modelled using the human brain. Standard computers today still rely on binary data, but quantum computing-based technologies would be able to encode data using the sub-atomic particles.

 

google_teams_up_with_oxford_university_for_ai_robotics_research_01

 

"We are thrilled to welcome these extremely talented machine learning researchers to the Google DeepMind team and are excited about the potential impact of the advances their research will bring," said Demis Hassabis, DeepMind co-founder and VP of Google engineering.

 

Google purchased DeepMind, which started as an AI company in Europe, with a focus on neuroscience-based machine learning systems and general-purpose learning algorithms. These partnerships will help create a strong foundation for future AI-based development, using skilled researchers to lend a hand.

Researchers create solar battery able to run powered by light and air

Researchers from Ohio State University are working on a solar battery that is able to store its own power inside of an internal solar cell. The unique hybrid device uses a mesh solar panel that provides an opening for air to enter the battery, and electrons can be transferred between the solar panel and the battery electrode.

 

researchers_create_solar_battery_that_might_make_clean_energy_cheaper_01

 

"The state of the art is to use a solar panel to capture the light, and then use a cheap battery to store the energy," said Yiying Wu, Ohio State chemistry and biochemistry professor, said in a press statement. "We've integrated both functions into one device. Any time you can do that, you reduce cost."

 

When licensed to companies, this could help companies drop costs up to 25 percent, according to Wu and his students. Light is converted inside of the battery, ensuring almost 100 percent of electrons are saved, as opposed to the 80 percent standard when electrons travel between a solar cell and an external battery.

Illegal drone flights over sports stadiums pose a security risk

Illegal drone flights over sports stadiums in Europe now have organizers worried about potential security concerns, after a drone flew an Albanian nationalist banner over a European Championship soccer qualifier between Serbia and Albania.

 

illegal_drone_flights_over_sports_stadiums_pose_a_security_risk_01

 

Instead of a harmless flag flying over the grounds, UEFA president Michael Platini wondered what would happen if a drone carried a bomb instead of a flag. It is difficult for aviation and security specialists to try to stop small drones flying over stadiums, as they are able to get extremely close to the spectators and sports players before being identified.

 

"It was highlighted as being an emerging issue at sports grounds, with the use of drones at grounds increasing significantly in the last two years," said Caroline Hale, Sports Ground Safety Authority head of communications. "We are reminding clubs that it is worth looking at their contingency plans in light of possible increased use of drones over sports grounds and look at potential risks arriving from a drone accident."

Commercial drones rising in popularity, with major ramifications

It seems unlikely that drones will become commonplace in everyday life for consumers, but that doesn't mean there aren't potential long-term ramifications. An estimated 12 percent of a booming $98 billion for aerial drone spending in the next 10 years will be dedicated to commercial drones.

 

commercial_drones_rising_in_popularity_with_major_ramifications_01

 

Looking ahead, companies hope to see drones used to deliver groceries and product shipments, along with agricultural development, and to help conduct high-level construction supervision. Starting in 2015, commercial drone flights - with drones weighing 55 pounds or less - will help offer guidelines and regulation of wide-scale drone use.

 

As more drones take to the skies, there will be continued concern of privacy and safety issues, which will remain a major threat. However, drone-powered applications will be required to meet certain standards to prevent possible invasion of privacy cases.

Research to create robots able to carry out household chores underway

Robotics research is a major effort among private companies and universities, with much of the attention on Japanese research and development, but there is a major effort underway in the United States. Technology is progressing and researchers hope to see robots take a prominent role in the household, helping humans carry out regular tasks.

 

research_to_create_robots_able_to_carry_out_household_chores_underway_01

 

The Kodiak robot is being developed by a team of researchers from the Cornell University Personal Robotics lab, in an effort to help owners use a robot to conduct basic household tasks. "The real high level goal for this project is basically just to have a robot do all those little things in your house that you don't want to do, said Ian Lenz, researcher and PhD student.

 

Kodiak is intuitive with the ability to learn tasks that it has never done before, able to manipulate a dynamic environment. Meanwhile, Japanese scientists hope robots can assist an aging population, easing the burden on caretakers and family members.

Gigi robot using ultraviolet light to help combat spread of Ebola

The Gigi robot is using its high-powered ultraviolet lights to help combat the spread of Ebola, able to blast UV light 25,000 times more powerful than natural sunlight, researchers say. Priced at $104,000 per robot, there are only a few units currently available, but has great potential in killing DNA in the virus. The robot uses xenon light rather than mercury bulbs, providing a healthier, more environmentally friendly solution.

 

gigi_robot_using_ultraviolet_to_help_combat_spread_of_ebola_01

 

"We can clean and disinfect a room (by hand) to an 85% level, but when we use the ultraviolet light we can clean that room to 99.9%," said Dr. Ray Casciari, St. Joseph Hospital pulmonary disease specialist. "This is the future of hospitals because 85% is not enough."

 

Due to Ebola cases in the United States, along with thousands of patients dying in West Africa, medical researchers hope technology can help prevent widespread infection. Created by Xenex Disinfection Services, a Texas-based company, Gigi was used in a Texas patient's treatment area to help prevent Ebola from spreading to other locations of the hospital.

Latest News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases
Subscribe to our Newsletter
Or Scroll Down