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Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 3

US military testing new floating seaport that can be located offshore

The US military is interested in testing floating seaports that could be used for large-scale operations, with a test taking place in Hawaii later this month. Using the Montford Point, a 785-foot US Navy vessel as a "mobile landing platform," the hope is to be able to see how realistic personnel and equipment can be transferred to shore.

 

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"In Culebra Koa we'll be expanding to mate different kinds of ships to it," said Lt. Russ Wolfkiel, spokesman for the Expeditionary Strike Group 3, in a statement published by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. "After (Marines) go in and take the shore, now you've got to move in material to support the war effort, or, in the case of (humanitarian assistance), how do you get that material ashore if your ports are not up to speed?"

 

The exercise will take place starting on May 18, and involve thousands of sailors and US Marines, Air Force and Army personnel. If implemented, using seaports and other sea-basing techniques can make it easier to deliver humanitarian relief and increase security.

Military wants to create better communication between robots, humans

Researchers from the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) and US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) are creating new methods for robots and humans to communicate more efficiently.

 

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The multi-modal human-robot dialogue would make use of natural language, but also include text, images and video processing. Ideally, military personnel would be able to more efficiently interact with computers and artificial intelligence, especially during missions when time is critical.

 

"Research and technology are essential for providing the best capabilities to our warfighters," said Dr. Laurel Allender, ARL Human Research and Engineering Directorate director, in a statement. "This is especially so for the immersive and live-training environments we are developing to achieve squad overmatch and to optimize soldier performance, both mentally and physically."

Continue reading 'Military wants to create better communication between robots, humans' (full post)

Tesla has reportedly received $800 million in Powerwall orders so far

When Tesla unveiled its new Powerwall home battery, I don't think most people thought it would take off as fast as it has. According to Bloomberg, Tesla has received over $800 million in orders for the Powerwall and Powerpack batteries so far.

 

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The site says that Tesla has received around $179 million worth of Powerwall reservations so far, with $625 million worth of Powerpack reservations to boot. Tesla has already said that it's taken in around 38,000 total reservations for Powerwall, and 2,500 reservations for Powerpack.

 

Tesla is selling the Powerwall for $3000 and $3500 for the 7kWh and 10kWh models, respectively. Powerpack units make even more money for Tesla, as they're being sold to businesses and utilities for power storage for $250 per kilowatt hour to use.

Advisor to the Australian PM says climate change is a 'hoax'

Maurice Newman, the chairman of Australia's Business Advisory Council has said that climate science is mostly "dud predictions", adding that "The real agenda is concentrated political authority. Global warming is the hook. It's about a new world order under the control of the UN".

 

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Newman reports to Tony Abbott, the Australian Prime Minister, and was appointed by Abbott himself to chair the Business Advisory Council, and has been a critic of climate science for quite sometime. Newman has put out a few false statements, including "95 percent of the climate models we are told prove the link between human CO2 emissions and catastrophic global warming have been found, after nearly two decades of temperature stasis, to be in error".

 

While this might sound like a crazy tinfoil hat conspiracy post, scientists don't exactly have all the answers when it comes to weather. Especially when there's trillions of dollars of trade at stake in virtually every industry thanks to 'climate change', and with YouTubers like Suspicious0bservers showing us that our Sun can influence the weather here on Earth, maybe this is something we need to be talking about?

Researchers learning from fish and bats to inspire robot development

Researchers from Northwestern University have monitored the swimming styles of the black ghost knifefish, cuttlefish and Persian carpet flatworm to create custom computer simulations. Using collected data, a "Ghostbot" has been created, in an effort to hopefully design next-generation underwater robots.

 

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Following a study published in PLOS Biology, researchers are now studying 22 different animls that move around using undulation-oscillation.

 

"There is a real need for underwater vehicles that are more maneuverable than the current things we use for disaster recovery or inspection of structures underwater," said Malcolm MacIver, one of the contributing senior authors of the study, said in a statement published by CBS News. "They are non-maneuverable, which results in things like with the BP oil disaster, the robots banging into oil well heads or what have you."

Continue reading 'Researchers learning from fish and bats to inspire robot development' (full post)

Extremely high demand for skilled artificial intelligence researchers

There is a major demand for skilled engineers and researchers with a background in artificial intelligence, with Google, Amazon, Facebook, and other companies recruiting. There currently aren't very many commercial uses for AI, but no one wants to be caught out as machines are expected to play a larger role in the future.

 

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"There's a massive battle under way for talent," said Oren Etzioni, head of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, in a statement published by the WSJ. "Virtually every professor at the UW computer-science department has been called many times to work at these companies, and frankly it's a very compelling pitch."

 

To help foster tomorrow's talent, companies are helping invest in - and create - research labs for universities with strong engineering programs. Even with concerns related to AI one day possibly spiraling out of control, lucrative partnerships and working relationships are being nurtured.

Trade group predicts 1 million drone flights per day in US by 2035

There could one day be 1 million drone flights per day in the United States by 2035, according to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is slowly embracing commercial drone flights, while consumers are increasingly flying drones for a number of recreational purposes.

 

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On the commercial side, farmers can now use drones to spray crops, and survey their property. Real estate agents and Hollywood film studios have also found use for drones, after receiving government approval.

 

"This is a billion-dollar technology market literally just waiting to take off," said Brian Markwalter, senior vice president of research for the CEA, in a statement. "We see a dynamic market with tremendous growth potential," as the FAA continues to study commercial drone flights over US soil.

Continue reading 'Trade group predicts 1 million drone flights per day in US by 2035' (full post)

US authority lets farmers spray crops from drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted farmers the ability to use the RMAX drone, which can hold fertilizer and pesticide tanks. The drone weighs more than 200 pounds and was developed by Yamaha, and is the first drone craft that can carry a significant payload.

 

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The FAA has been careful in approving aircraft for commercial use, with farmers using small drones for agricultural purposes. The drones are mainly taking pictures and helping land owners inspect their crops, and for little else.

 

However, using drones for precision spraying will help limit costs, and keep material costs down - in such cases as vineyards, which can be difficult to access by ground workers.

Continue reading 'US authority lets farmers spray crops from drones' (full post)

Japan's age gap expanding, with robots seen as possible aid

For better or worse, the robotics revolution is underway, and it's continuing to happen regardless of some concerns expressed by humans. In Japan, a leading robotics research nation, engineers hope that robots can play a role in helping close the workforce gap due to an aging population.

 

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Toshiba's Aiko Chihira humanoid robot is currently on display in a Tokyo department store, where it recently performed a few songs alongside a human band. Nestle is testing SoftBank's "Pepper" robot as a method to help sell coffee machines, while other companies hope the robot is able to engage in store visitors.

 

The Huis Ten Bosch theme park located in Nagasaki will feature a hotel that has more than 90 percent of hotel services conducted by robots alone. There are no easy answers for Japan, which has an aging population that is only getting older, so adopting robots could prove to be an effective way to ease pressure on the workforce.

NASA tests shape-changing wing to help cut down on fuel costs

NASA is working with the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and FlexSys to test a new morphing wing technology that uses a seamless flexible edge. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) provides major improvements when compared to conventional flaps that are used on aircraft today.

 

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"Armstrong's work with ACTE is a great example of how NASA works with our government and industry partners to develop innovative technologies that make big leaps in efficiency and environmental performance," said Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directatorate. "This is consistent with the agency's goal to support the nation's leadership in the aviation sector."

 

The NASA Langley Research Center will now study flight tests to help create designs used for large transport aircraft.

Continue reading 'NASA tests shape-changing wing to help cut down on fuel costs' (full post)

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